Securities Act of 1933

See Also:
Primary Market
Securities Exchange Act of 1934
Investment Banks
Secondary Market
Initial Public Offering (IPO)

Securities Act of 1933

The Securities Act of 1933 was a landmark decision in the United States to regulate the issuance of newly issued shares into the market – an initial public offering. The act is also there for companies to register before the issuance as to ensure reliability.

Securities Act of 1933 Meaning

The Securities Act of 1933 followed the stock market crash in 1929. It was a movement to regulate the markets as to not mislead investors. Furthermore, the idea requires due diligence so that the best possible information would hit the market. The 1933 Securities Act was also meant to do away with insider information. By requiring this information to be provided pre-issuance investors presented with the opportunity to buy shares of the firm, during the investment banker’s road show, can make well informed decisions. The due diligence required by the 1933 Securities Act is to have a full audit and compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Without registration and a following of the 1933 Securities Act rules a firm cannot be listed on a U.S. stock exchange until the requirements are satisfied.

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securities act of 1933

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