Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

See Also:
Secondary Market
Securities Act of 1933
New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
Primary Market
Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX)

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 deals with the regulation of secondary market transactions, or outstanding securities in the market (which can be traded on a daily basis). The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulates this act.

Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Meaning

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 was established after the stock market crash of 1929 – the following Great Depression. The 1934 Securities Exchange Act is meant to provide meaningful and relevant information to the average investor. This ensures that the investor is not mislead in anyway so that they are able to make well informed decisions. The Securities Exchange Act regulations include the need for quarterly and annual audits by an accounting firm. These accounting firms then attest to the accuracy of the statements.
The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 thus ensures that there is no fraud that exist within the company. It also deals with insider trading. If an investor has information that is non-public in nature then, then under the 1934 Securities Exchange Act, he/she may not act on it until the information has gone public. The idea is to provide a fair and equal market so there are no unusual transactions to set the market adrift.
securities exchange act of 1934

ARTICLES YOU MIGHT LIKE

Selling Your Business to a Private Equity Group

Private Equity companies are companies that have raised capital from investors and they have created funds. Each fund may have its own legal mandate. These are common examples of mandates: Invests only in oil and gas companies Is agnostic to what industry it invests in Invests only in companies it controls Private Equity companies come

Read More »

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

See Also: S Corporation General Partnership Limited Partnership Partnership Sole Proprietorship Role of a Company Back Office Limited Liability Company (LLC) Definition A Limited Liability Company or LLC is a business form which provides limited liability much like a corporation. There can be an unlimited number of members to the company. There are also many

Read More »

Single Member LLC Definition

Single Member LLC Definition A Single Member LLC definition is a limited liability company with one member. It’s a type of entity that has caught on across the United States. It was created to satisfy emerging needs from the rapidly changing business world. One example of this is the owner/member requirements of limited liability companies.

Read More »

JOIN OUR NEXT SERIES

Financial Leadership Workshop

MARCH 28TH-31ST 2022

THE ART OF THE CFO®

Financial Leadership Workshop

Days
Hours
Min

September 12-15th 2022

Days
Hours
Min
SHARE THIS ARTICLE

JOIN THE NEXT STRATEGIC CFO™ WORKSHOP SERIES

Strategic CFO™ Financial Leadership Workshop
The Art Of The CFO®

Days
Hours
Min

September 12-15th 2022