Due Diligence

See Also:
Due Diligence on Lenders
Auditor
Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A)
Audit Committee
Loan Agreement

Due Diligence Definition

Due Diligence is an extensive qualitative and quantitative look at a company in order to make the best informed business decision about a company. Furthermore, Due Diligence is often associated with audits, where it is required before a public offering, as well as mergers and acquisitions in order to reduce the risk in the market for these activities.

Due Diligence Meaning

Due Diligence often becomes necessary when a large transaction is about to take place like a merger or loan agreement, or when the company’s financials are going to be presented to the public. Often times, due diligence requires the assessment to be both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. A qualitative act of due diligence may be to assess the mental state and capability of the management. This can be done through plant tours to see how the company is run, down to interviews with several employees, suppliers, buyers and others who deal with the company on a day to day basis. Quantitative due diligence includes thorough investigations of the books and records. This can range from asset appraisals to day to day transactions. A thorough understanding of internal controls and its effectiveness also become necessary to ensure the risk for the business is as low as possible.

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due diligence definition

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