Goodwill Accounting Term

See Also:
Accounting Income vs Economic Income
Depreciation
Cash Flow Statement
Income Statement
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
Goodwill Impairment

Goodwill Accounting Definition

Goodwill is an intangible asset. It represents non-physical assets, such as brand name and reputation, and shows up on the asset side of a company’s balance sheet.

A company often acquires goodwill by purchasing another company. For example, company A is going to purchase company B. Company B has net tangible assets of $8 million. But company A will pay $10 million to acquire company B. Company A is willing to pay a premium because of company B’s good reputation. The residual, $2 million, is goodwill, and it shows up on company A’s balance sheet as an intangible asset. So, in the case of an acquisition, goodwill can be calculated like this:

Goodwill = Purchase Price – Net Assets

According to a recent accounting regulation, FASB 142, goodwill is no longer amortized. Instead, its value can be adjusted periodically for impairment.

Goodwill Accounts

Goodwill accounts show up on the assets side of a company’s balance sheet. The account represents intangible assets, such as a company’s brand name or reputation, that have value but are not physical assets.

Goodwill and Business Valuation

When a business valuation is performed, it can be tricky to accurately value intangible assets such as goodwill and its impairment. When a valuation becomes complex, it is standard practice to consult with a valuation firm. Need help finding one? We will get you connected with one of our strategic partners for your valuation needs. Fill out the form below to get connected:

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