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Reposition Your Accountants to Revenue Generating Positions

A concern we often hear from CEOs when transitioning to outsourced accounting services is that although they’ve outgrown their current in-house bookkeeper, but they don’t want to fire them. This employee may be hard working, knowledgeable about the business, and add value to the company. How might their role adapt when switching your bookkeeping or accounting to an outsourced service provider? Simply, reposition your accountants to revenue generating positions or value-adding positions.

Reposition Your Accountants to Revenue Generating Positions

So, how do you reposition your accountants to revenue generating positions? You could have your bookkeeper continue to handle certain accounting functions in-house. Or if you transition completely to a virtual accounting department, then the outsourced service team will still need a liaison. Either way, your in-house bookkeeper could continue to have some of the same responsibilities, but it will allow them to have an opportunity to use their knowledge and time to contribute more effectively to profit generating activities.

Reevaluated Responsibilities

The best thing you can do for your bookkeeper (and for the business) is to reevaluate their responsibilities and give them the opportunity to grow their skills and interest. If you value your staff as important resources in your company, listening to their training needs, career goals and ideas for your business will allow them to feel like the transition is not a threat to their job.

Train Accountants to be Profit-Producing Assets

If your employee becomes a profit-producing asset, then it will help increase productivity and profitability. They know your business well. If you put them into an income generating role, then they will feel encouraged with how they are contributing to the success of the company.


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Examples of Repositioning Accountants to Revenue Generating Positions

Below are two short stories of clients that were able to reposition their bookkeeping employee to their profit center after transitioning to outsourced accounting services…

Office Manager to Revenue Generating Position

This first client example is about an office manager, Greta. She was with the company since it was founded. Greta didn’t have an accounting degree but was doing the bookkeeping and office management. She was really doing a bit of everything – bookkeeping, HR, managing the office… Management realized that the company was outgrowing her bookkeeping skills.

Greta knew all the clients and knew about all of the services they provided since she did the bookkeeping and the invoicing. She would also call the clients to do collections. As a result, she was aware of what services people were happy with and what they were not happy with.

Greta has been there from the very beginning and is very knowledgeable about the company. The CEO wanted to grow the business but needed help, and decided to transition to outsourced accounting services. The CEO asked Greta if she would help with the proposals. She was thrilled about the idea. It turned out that because of all of her domain knowledge, she became exceptional at being a proposal writer. Greta knew all the clients and all the services. Since she was already helping with the proposals and doing the billing from those proposals, she also understood the process. Greta now feels more engaged getting involved in the sales process and is glad to be in an revenue generating position.

Bookkeeper to Revenue Generating Position

This next client example is about a bookkeeper, Lisa. Lisa was doing all of the bookkeeping tasks. Lisa also helped with HR, IT, and office management. She actually hated doing the bookkeeping and accounting tasks, but she was a good employee and very knowledgeable about the company and services. The company had decided to transition to outsourced bookkeeping and accounting but didn’t want to fire Lisa. So they decided to reposition her into a business development position.

Lisa was now in charge of networking, going to the Chamber of Commerce events, and working their booth at trade shows. She also visits with clients and makes client calls and because she’s been with the company so long. In the end, she’s as comfortable talking about the company as the CEO is.

Preventing Employee Turnover by Changing Roles

Repositioning a valuable employee into a role that can be profitable and productive, contributes to the growth and success of the organization.

A goal for management should be preventing the negative implications and financial impacts of turnover. You want to keep your valuable employees, but you also want to be sure you are getting what you need from your bookkeeping and accounting financial operations.

Many businesses transition to outsourced accounting services as a more cost-effective, efficient, and viable alternative to in-house accounting. The cost of outsourcing your bookkeeping and accounting makes it easier to budget and helps remove the burden of hiring, managing, and training accounting staff.

Benefits of Outsourcing Bookkeeping and Accounting

Benefits of outsourcing bookkeeping and accounting for small businesses include the following:

  • Reducing costs
  • Improving operational efficiencies and reducing manual processes
  • Streamlined and integrated financial systems achieving timely, accurate, and meaningful financials
  • Greater financial intelligence with management reporting for strategic decision-making
  • Understanding your KPIs for analyzing the numbers to grow your business or fulfill your mission

Valuable employees are an asset to your business. If you are ready to switch to outsourcing, but want to keep your bookkeeper as an employee, then consider repositioning them. You can outsource all or portions of their job and have them spend their time on revenue generating activities.

Reposition Your Accountants to Revenue Generating Positions


Stephen King is the President and CEO of Growthforce, an outsourced bookkeeping firm.

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4 Problems with In-House Accounting

When running a business, the goal is to have good operations and profits. You’re also in a constant state of awareness for ways to protect your business from harm – whether that comes in the form of increased competition, property loss due to theft, or some other factor. Have you considered staffing and managing an in-house accounting department? This is a very important and foundational part of any business, so it’s key that you address accounting. Now, your bookkeeping may be managing its bookkeeping and accounting in-house; however, that may not be the smartest choice. There are 4 problems with in-house accounting that we are going to take a look at in this blog.

4 Problems with In-House Accounting

Whatever your reason for wanting to keep your accounting in-house – control – it’s important to know how those problems with in-house accounting may impact your business.

1. Costly Bookkeeping Mistakes

If you employ a bookkeeper to handle your day-to-day financials, then you’re relying on one single person for this critical function. Since human beings are fallible, it’s not unusual for people to make mistakes. This is especially true when said person is inexperienced and/or tired.

In the best-case scenario, your bookkeeper or accountant will catch any mistakes made themselves before you catch it. Then, they will correct them in a timely manner.

In the worst-case scenario, however, a mistake will go unnoticed. That means it could be used to generate reports or even prepare audit and tax readiness inaccurately — and that’s the last place you want errors. In other words, one single mistake can have far-reaching consequences for your company, both financially and fiscally.

On the other hand, if you outsource your accounting to a reputable firm, then you’re guaranteed that the expert services you receive are accurate. With an entire team looking at your books and handling your reporting, any errors are more likely to quickly be noticed. And the team can address those issues immediately.


Click here to download: The Guide to Outsourcing Your Bookkeeping & Accounting for SMBs


2. Outdated In-House Financial Training

When you hired your accountant, you probably took great care to verify that their certifications were valid and up-to-date. Yet over time, even the best training becomes outdated. Just look at the new revenue recognition updates!

Accounting professionals need to stay current not only about things like new software and integrated apps for greater efficiency, but more importantly about things like amended regulations, changes to tax rules, and other important developments that affect their field.

Unfortunately, especially when your bookkeeper or accountant has a heavy workload, it can be challenging for him or her to stay current with these things. Furthermore, it’s going to be difficult for them to complete any professional development courses. That means that before too long, the quality of your in-house bookkeeping and accounting will suffer.

When you outsource your accounting, the right firm will ensure that its people are up-to-date on all of the latest technology, regulations, tax codes, and other developments. That means you never have to worry about the quality of your accounting.

3. Potential Internal Fraud

On average, organizations lose 5% of revenue to fraud annually. In addition, small businesses are typically more susceptible to fraud. Why? Because they don’t have the resources to perform all of the checks and balances needed to detect and combat fraud. Payroll fraud and skimming are common types of fraud that occur.

In a larger company, you can set up a system of internal controls to ensure that the various financial responsibilities and authorizations are handled by different people. In a small company, this often comes down to one or two people.

No matter how much you trust your bookkeeper or accountant, he or she can miss all the signs of fraud. What’s worse is that they could even be the person committing fraud. And when you know that the average fraud incident for small businesses amounts to $150,000 median loss, then you have to ask yourself, “Can my company afford this kind of risk?”

An outsourced accounting firm provides protection against fraud by ensuring multiple people review your accounts providing separation of duties and follow up on every potential sign of wrongdoing.

The best firms have procedures in place that virtually eliminate the chances of fraud going undetected. If they do detect fraud, then they can follow the trail back to determine which of your employees is the fraudster. Then you can take appropriate action.

4. Higher Costs for In-House Accounting Staff

Hiring a full-time bookkeeper or accountant involves significant costs. First of all, there’s the time and money that goes into recruiting, screening, and onboarding the new employee. If you work with a recruiter to do this quickly, then you’re looking at a bill of between 20-30% of the new employee’s salary. Then, there are the costs of employee salary or wages.

According to GlassDoor, U.S. salaries average $43,874 for a bookkeeper, $55,093 for a staff accountant, and $100,705 for a controller annually. Of course, there are also additional costs such as benefits, paid time off, retirement, overhead, etc. And last but not least, you have a contractual and financial commitment to the employee. You can’t simply let them go without a certain financial obligation.

In contrast, an accountant’s firm will cost between $24k-$60k annually. That range depends on the size of your company and the type of services you require. On average, you can expect to pay around $2,500 per month when you outsource your business’s bookkeeping and accounting. That’s considerably less than hiring a full-time bookkeeper!

If you want to learn more about how outsourcing your accounting can help your business, then contact us at GrowthForce. We’re always happy to learn about your business needs and discuss how we can help you achieve your financial goals. In the meantime, download our free Guide to Outsourcing Your Bookkeeping & Accounting to avoid those problems with in-house accounting.

Problems with In-House Accounting


Stephen King is a guest blogger at The Strategic CFO. He is the President and CEO of Growthforce, an outsourced bookkeeping firm.

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Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

Hire For Traits, Not For TalentYou have probably heard the term, hire for traits, not for talent. I can tell you ever since I first heard of this term, I have gone back in time and the different experiences I have had, that related to this term over the last 28 years of my career.  I am convinced more than ever that we should all apply this to ever hire we make.

Hire for traits, not for talent.

Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

You would be surprised, or maybe not, how many times I have worked with accounting, finance, or operational professionals that really knew their stuff.  Technically, they were all there and then some. But when it came with dealing with these individuals on a personal level, they were very difficult to deal with or even impossible to deal with.


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Case Studies

In my 28+ years of experience, I have had numerous good and bad experiences hiring. Let’s look at a few of them!

“Super Star” Divisional Controller That Knew It All

I worked for a large publicly traded company, and the operating world was divided into regions for the entire world. So, there were several divisional controllers. Well, there was this “super star” divisional controller that knew it all. He was technically the smartest guy in the room when it came to the latest accounting pronouncements. But when it came to dealing with people, this mad man was impossible to deal with. He was rude, had temper tantrums, and was just a jerk. He got the job because on paper he was a super star. But when it came to working with others, it was impossible. As a result, he had a short career at the company.

Cancer In the Organization

I also dealt with an operating guy recently who was hired for his technical expertise in a specific operation. He was very talented when it came to the operation of the business. But once again, he was insubordinate, treated others like dirt, and just a cancer in the organization.

Sponge in Learning

On the contrary, I recently hired a young man with very little work experience, smart, and was a sponge in learning about the business or how we did things. This young man has turned out to be a real super star. I did not hire him for his talents, but his traits and ability to work well with others.

Conclusion: Hiring for Traits

The stories above are real and I have another dozen like these.  All of these individuals had “talent” in there area of expertise, but their personal traits varied. Those that failed had horrible personal traits. Those individuals that I have worked with that had excellent personal traits turned out to be excellent employees. An individual with exceptional personal traits can learn anything.

Personally, I would want to always hire that person that has exceptional personal traits, and maybe average on talent. Why? Because I know I can train this person and make him or her a super star. Think about those individuals that you have worked with in your career. Think of their traits versus talent. Someone can have exceptional talent, but if they can not get along with others, work in a team environment or have other horrible traits, then that person will always fail. Don’t make the same mistakes when hiring your next employee. Learn about our 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team and how hiring for traits is the way to go!

Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

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Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

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The Importance of Knowing Your Leadership Competencies

Knowing Your Leadership Competencies, unique ability

Two weeks ago, our team celebrated 1 year since the acquisition of The Strategic CFO. In the past 12 months, we’ve grown significantly in the number of team members and clients. In our meeting, I put the quote up on the screen… “Life is simple… People complicate it.” Everyone laughed because it is so true. As we shared stories, challenges, successes, etc. in my team meeting, I asked them if they knew what they were competent and incompetent at. Everyone is incompetent at something. Financial leaders need to understand the importance of knowing your leadership competencies.
Truly successful people spend 80-90% of their time utilizing their excellent and unique abilities and delegate the rest.

The Importance of Knowing Your Leadership Competencies

Before we begin, I want to define leadership. It’s the ability to guide, direct, and influence people. There are four types of ability that a leader must know about themselves. Those include the following:

  1. Incompetent
  2. Competent
  3. Excellent
  4. Unique Ability
Become a better financial leader by learning exactly what CEOs want from their CFOs. You can find these habits or traits7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs whitepaper in our .

Know What Your Incompetencies Are

First, you need to know what your incompetencies are. Incompetent indicates the activities that you are not good at and the things that you don’t do well. Everyone is incompetent at something. Some incompetencies could be translating the numbers to something the CEO could use to make decisions, knowing the ins and outs of your accounting system, or working with technology. Before you can start to figure out what you are competent at, you need to know what you are not good at.

Write those incompetencies down. If you are asked to do work in those areas, either defer or delegate. It is not worth your time to invest in those areas when they are not profitable.

Know What Your Competencies Are

Then identify your competencies; these are activities that you are okay at, but the majority of others are better. In other words, the general population is good at that thing. For example, all accountants will know where assets, liabilities, and equity go on the balance sheet.

What Are You Excellent At?

After you have identified your incompetencies and competencies, then ask yourself… “What are you excellent at?” This refers to the activities that you excel at, but so do a few others. If you have a knack for knowing where to unlock cash after just looking at the financial statements, then it may be time to focus more of your energy there. Not everyone will have this skill though.

Know Your Unique Ability

Finally, know your unique ability. Your unique ability are the abilities only you possess. These are activities that drive value for yourself and others. In addition, your unique ability must be valued by society.

Strategic Coach outlines the four areas that you need to look at when identifying your unique ability:

  • Passion
  • Superior Skill
  • Energy
  • Never-Ending Improvement
So, how do you tell the difference between your unique abilities and your incompetence activities? Your unique ability gives you energy and your incompetence zaps your energy!

Inventory of Role

If you want to be really effective as a CFO and a financial leader, then you need to know what you are already doing and what your CEO wants more of. In our Financial Leadership Workshop, we walk our participants through an extensive inventory of role. Some of the areas that CEOs wants more from there financial leaders include:

If you want to go through this exercise AND 32 hours of coaching from me, then click here to learn about our Financial Leadership Workshop. Registration for our series starting December 2018 is now open. Contact us for more information and to register.

The Role of the CFO

While the CEO must balance the vision, growth, implementation, cash, and profitability of the company, the role of the CFO is to compliment the skills and unique abilities of the entrepreneur. You would not find Steve Jobs or Jeff Bezos in the accounting department, but they sure need(ed) support from their financial leader to make innovation happen.

To learn other ways to be more effective in your role as the financial leader, click here to access our most popular whitepaper – the 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

Knowing Your Leadership Competencies, unique ability

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Knowing Your Leadership Competencies, unique ability

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Strategy for Managing Cash

managing cash

Does your company have a strategy for managing cash?  Many companies have established procedures for purchasing materials, collecting customer payments, and paying vendors. But often people either do not communicate these procedures or simply don’t follow them consistently. Even when everyone is aware of and follows the established protocol, your system may be flawed. Before we show an example, you need to know how to manage cash flow

Know How to Manage Cash Flow

We all know that cash is king – liquidity is essential for survival. Many entrepreneurs only know how much is in the bank, but they don’t understand how much cash they actually have. So, how does one manage cash flow? First, you need tools. Here are a few tools that can help a company manage cash flow:


Download eBook 28 Ways to Improve Your Business's Cash Flow


Manage and Work Your Operating Cycle

Then you need to manage and work your operating cycle. Your operating cycle is “how many days it takes to turn purchases of inventory into cash receipts from its eventual sale”. It indicates true liquidity – how quickly you can turn your assets into cash. Calculate how long your operating cycle is using the following formula:

Operating cycle = DIO + DSO – DPO

Watch Your Expenses

Watch your expenses carefully. If you do not have an eye on SG&A and procedures on what can be purchased, then you risk racking up unnecessary overhead. Think about too much inventory, unnecessary equipment replacements, extreme marketing budgets, etc. 

Use Cash Wisely

Use your cash wisely. Always be thinking about will this add value to my company? when spending your valuable cash. If you will not see a return on your investment, then consider spending the cash elsewhere. 

Collect Quicker

Another method to manage (and improve) cash flow is to collect quicker. This is a great method to use if you are in a cash crunch and can only make small improvements. For example, there is a $10 million company that collected their accounts receivable every 365 days. They had a lot of cash tied up. If they improved their DSO 5 days, that would be an extra $137,000 of free cash flow

Example of Strategy for Managing Cash

Let’s look at an example of a strategy for managing cash flow. Imagine that Company A has 120 days of inventory on hand. They collect receivables in 60 days. And they pay payables within 30 days.  Even assuming that this is their established cash management strategy and everyone follows it, Company A will still find itself in a cash crunch. This is because of the disparity of time that cash is tied up in inventory and receivables versus the speed with which it pays its payables.

So what can Company A do to free up cash?  Here’s a link to an article that talks about how to develop a strategy for managing cash and techniques to improve cash flow.

Strategy for Managing Cash, How to Manage Cash Flow


Originally posted by Lisa Knight on February 19, 2015. 

Strategy for Managing Cash, How to Manage Cash Flow

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Does Your Management Team Understand the Financials?

As companies grow, more and more people get involved with the operations of the business. Whether you have a manufacturing business or service business, this eventually grows beyond a one-man show. Sales people, engineers, and technical people often become the leaders responsible for driving your business and adding to the top line. Everyone understands what a new client means and what revenue is. So, does your management team understand the financials?

Management Team Understand the FinancialsDoes Your Management Team Understand the Financials?

The challenge is when a business grows, companies add people to operations, the management level, vice president positions, etc., but they do not have a solid understanding of the financial statements. We often see this in high growth businesses, where the focus is on sales as it should be, but only the CEO, Controller, or CFO understand the other parts of the financial statements.

Why Your Operations People Should Understand All The Financial Statements

I recently witnessed a business that had a steady run rate of sales and EBITDA at a very attractive rate. Then, the operation was handed over to an “expert” in the industry. This industry expert does know a lot about how to technically process something, but he has no clue about how a business really operates. In one month, he changed the focus of the production to one project. While, this one project was completed in record time, all other projects came to a standstill. Now, the business ran out of work in process and finished goods, and sales suffered the following month.

If the industry expert understood the balance sheet, inventory, A/R and A/P (in addition to sales, cost of sales, and cash flow), then the company would have avoided this poor performance in the following month. Anyone in charge of an operation or in a management position must understand how their activity affects the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow. They are all tied together and all get affected with operational activities.

It All Turns Into Cash or Lack of Cash Eventually

My prediction is that in the following 4-6 weeks, that business mentioned above will find itself in a cash tight position. Remember, CASH IS KING!  Everything you do will have an effect on cash one way or another. The lack of planning in a production environment causes work in process inventory to run out, sales to suffer in the following month, and ultimately, cash to get tight.

Cash is king. That’s why we created the 25 Ways to Improve Cash Flow. This valuable resource has helped many of our clients get out a cash tight situation and become flush with cash.

Educate Beyond the CEO, CFO, and Controller

I am a big believer that it is the company’s responsibility to educate the management team that has “P&L Responsibility”. I do not mean  just the P&L.  Everyone with responsibility for the bottom line, profit, and cash should have a general understanding of the impact to all three financial statements. Not everyone is an accountant, and they should not be. But it is our responsibility to educate those that have operations responsibility that affect the bottom line. I am a big proponent of workshops and educational courses for operations people. In a few days, you can give them enough knowledge to at least have them ask the right questions. But as CFOs, Controllers, and CEOs, we need to provide that education so that the people making operational decisions have a positive impact on the bottom line and cash.

From Operations to P&L Leader

We have specifically designed a 4-day workshop for this exact purpose. It is called “From Operations to P&L Leader”. We are not out to have operations people become accountants; however, our goal is to simply provide enough data and understanding of how operations and the financial statements are tied together. Furthermore, we show participants how their decisions in operations affect all three financial statements – the Income Statement, the Balance Sheet, and the Cash Flow Statement.

Educate, hold accountable, and have deliverables. This will lead to a successful organization!


If you want to increase cash flow, then click here to access our 25 Ways to Improve Cash Flow whitepaper.

Management Team Understand the Financials
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Management Team Understand the Financials

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How to Make Dramatic Changes in Business

How to Make Dramatic Changes in Business

Recently, we had a coaching participant mention to us how her company was wanting to make a huge change in their business that would ultimately destroy the current business. This happens more often that you would think. The owner or founder of the company wants to make a shift, a change, but the leadership did not full think through what that would actually look like. In our coaching participants case, her company had been around for a long time. They were known widely for their innovation. They were also a non-profit. The founder wanted to convert the company into a for-profit entity. That change would change EVERYTHING. In fact, it would be an entirely different company. In this week’s blog, we look at how to make dramatic changes in business while avoiding catastrophe and how to reinvent your company.

Change requires a strong leader. Learn how to be a more effective leader here.

How to Make Dramatic Changes in Business

When a company makes dramatic changes in their organization, it’s important to ensure the change will be sustainable and has the benefits outweigh the risks. This starts with questions like… How can we better develop our product/service to provide more value to our customer? What organizational changes can we make to reduce overhead and increase productivity? Is our current company structure the best structure for accomplishing our mission? Do we need to totally reinvent ourselves just to survive?

In our first example, changing the organization from a non-profit to a for-profit would only stuff the founder’s pockets; however, upon further conversations with their Finance Director, we came to the conclusion that that organizational structure change would change everythingmarketing, branding, funding, employees, legal aspects, and accounting. It would cost more to make that dramatic change than to stay the same. They would most likely loose their funding, their employees, and their entire culture.  They apparently were making a change for the wrong reasons.

Driving Radical Change • McKinsey

In a McKinsey article called Driving Radical Change, they outline how to make dramatic changes in business. It first starts with the aspiration – the goal for the change. Then, the leadership for the change needs to be addressed. Who is doing what? What are the priorities? The next two steps include articulating actionable steps for employees to act on and the direct impact they have on the change. This stage is what really fuels the change. Leadership needs to engage and energize their employees during change (change is scary for most people). Read more about making radical change here.

How to Make Dramatic Changes in Business

Why Make Dramatic Changes in Business

So, why make dramatic changes in business? Sometimes, it just needs to happen. Businesses can get stuck in a “rut” where they continue to practice the way that they have always done without evaluating the changing environment or their team. If your company has not made a change (or at least evaluated current practices) in a decade, then it’s time to look at whether radical change is necessary.

Reasons to change include but are not limited to the following:

  • It’s just not working
  • Competition is growing and taking business away
  • There are legal restrictions
  • The market is shifting
  • Technology shift (this is probably the most common in the last decade)
  • New opportunities identified
  • Customers demand something else

Changes could include the following:

Sustaining Business After Big Changes

So many businesses have made changes due to technology advancements, competition, etc. Barnes & Noble has been through numerous CEOs because they did not continue to press on with their Nook and e-commerce platform. Netflix went through a period of declined stock prices as they pressed on to be a primarily online-streaming platform. Sustaining business after big changes can be difficult, but it all comes down to the leadership. Forbes contributor, Erika Anderson, says, “When CEOs and their teams fail to fully commit to change, change fails.” The entire company needs to commit to making this change successful. If one link in the chain is weak, then the whole project will fall.

Here are a few more notables:

  • Amazon started as an online book sales company; it is now a large distribution and logistics company
  • Western Union started as a telegraph company, then it grew to one of the largest money transfer companies in the world
  • Nokia started selling rubber boots; it is now is a major cell phone manufacturer
  • Shell (the major oil company) started in a small store in England importing and selling shells

There is a great quote that I saw in an article from MONEY… “A successful company is like a giant great white shark. In its prime, it chews up the competition, but if it dares to sit still for too long, it dies.”

Your CEO needs a strong leader – especially a strong financial leader. Learn our 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs and become the strong leader your CEO needs.

Supporting Change as the Financial Leader

Change is uncomfortable for everyone because there is uncertainty about the results. Accounting type people are often prone to being the no-sayers during change. It’s too expensive, too risky, and too advantageous. When making dramatic changes in your business, it’s important for the financial leader to support the change. If a certain change will dramatically impact cash flow and profitability, then work with your CEO to figure out what you can do. Do not just say “no”. The CEO needs a trusted advisor, a confidant, someone who they can rely on for a more financially sound way of doing something.  In my experience, change has usually been good and for the right reason. To learn other ways to be more effective in your role as the financial leader (and to become a trusted advisor), click here to access our most popular whitepaper – the 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

Dramatic Changes in Business

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Dramatic Changes in Business

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