Tag Archives | turnover

Cost of Turnover

See also:
Hire For Traits, Not For Talent
Corporate Zombies: Combat the Rise of Unengaged Employees
Millennials: The Hippies of the 21st Century
Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO

Cost of Turnover

If you take a look at any company’s income statement, you will notice that one of the largest expense items is salaries or compensation. While companies require employees to conduct business, it is expensive to have them. What happens when those employees leave? Many times, companies do not calculate the cost of turnover and how it impacts the bottom line.


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What is the Cost of Turnover?

The cost of turnover is the cost associated with turning over one position. This calculation includes the cost of hiring for that position, training the new employee, any severance or bonus packages, and managing the role when it is not filled.  Every company will experience some turnover. When a company has high employee turnover, they risk impacting the profitability of their organization, the culture, and the productivity.

Every organization should strive to retain their employees for as long as possible. If they see a uptick in employee turnover, then they should take action to reduce turnover and improve retention. This results in more efficient operations and higher profits.

How Turnover Impacts Profitability

Previously, we mentioned that turnover impacts profitability. There are various ways employee turnover impacts the profitability of a company, including employees picking up duties (overtime pay, injury, exhaustion, decrease productivity), the cost of hiring a new employee, and the overall state of the company’s culture. For example, a company that has a heavy presence on the web looses its marketing director. The current employees will have to figure out what that position actually did, pick up extra responsibilities, work overtimes, etc. If it was a planned departure (more than two weeks), then the transition may be more smooth; however, if it was an unexpected departure, then the company will be in a bind.

Now, it’s time to fill that vacant role. That takes time – especially, if you are slow to hire and quick to fire. In addition, the current hiring process is not cheap either. No matter where that employee lies on the income statement – in COGS or SG&A – employee turnover has a huge impact to the bottom line. Either, you experience a sales person that is not selling (decreased revenue and increased costs) or a support person that is just increasing costs.

Calculate the Cost of Turnover

So, how do you calculate the cost of turnover? First, know the primary costs that are associated to turnover 1 position. Those include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cost of hiring
  • Cost of training and/or onboarding
  • Any severance or bonus packages upon departure
  • Loss in productivity during vacancy
  • Errors in customer service
  • Loss of engagement from other employees

Use the following formula to calculate the cost of turnover:

Cost of Turnover = (Cost of Hiring + Cost of Onboarding and Training + Severance + Loss in Productivity) * Number of Employees Lost

Focus On Employee Retention

Turnover impacts profitability, so it is important that you focus on employee retention. There are several reasons to focus on employee retention, including consistency, the bottom line, culture, and reputation.

Learn how to be a financial leader who increases employee retention in their organization with our execution plans, whitepapers, webinars, office hours, and so much more in the SCFO Lab.

Consistency

Consistency is key in any company. If your company is experiencing turnover in a client facing role, then turnover will cause more problems than profitability. For example, a consulting agency has 5 project managers in a year. The clients do not know who is there project manager or if anything is getting dropped or who to contact. It’s simply frustrating. In another example, a company looses all of its experienced team members within a few months. Now, they have new employees that are not familiar with the process, systems, team, or company. It will be hard for that company to gain any momentum without a consistent staff or a staff dominated by rookies.

Bottom Line 

On average, every time an employee leaves, it takes 6-9 months of salary to find a replacement. For example, if a person leaves and made $40,000, that’s anywhere between $20-30,000 of hiring and onboarding costs that were not previously anticipated. If you lose a higher level employee, then expect to pay more. The cost of turnover makes a dent in the bottom line.

Culture

How can you establish a company culture when your workforce is constantly changing? Establishing a good culture is difficult to do, but establishing a culture when there is no consistent workforce is near to impossible. We have seen how culture impacts the financial results of the company.

Reputation 

Beyond company culture, high employee turnover impacts the company’s reputation. Job seekers research the companies when applying to a position. If you cannot retain employees, then what does that say about your company? Your brand and reputation will be impacted by turnover. Unfortunately for the company, there are online resources such as Glassdoor that give employees and ex-employees a platform to give honest feedback about the company.


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Employee Retention Definition

The employee retention definition is the company’s ability to retain its current employees. If a company has a 95% retention rate, it means that the organization retained 95% of its employees for the given period. Every company should strive to improve their employee retention rate as it influences the culture and impacts the company’s profits.

Effective Employee Retention Strategies

The following includes effective employee retention strategies.

Establish Clear Goals and Expectations

First, establish clear goals and expectations. Employees become frustrated when they are unsure as to what their duties and expectations are. Communicate clearly with your team what your expectations are and what their responsibilities are. In addition, make goals together as a team. They will be more attainable, and everyone will be on the same page.

Offer Competitive Benefits

Among many reasons, studies rate salary as a top reason why employees leave a company. If your company is not able to exceed competitive benefits, then at least offer comparable benefits. Remember, salary is not the only reason why employees leave.

Culture

Culture is proven to impact the financial results of an organization. Establish a company culture that makes it enjoyable for your employees to work there. Some companies like Zappos are extremely customer centric. Other companies may offer flexible working environments (remote work, flex desks, etc.). Moreover, create a culture of open communication. The #1 reason why someone leaves a company is not because of salary, but it’s because of the manager. If there is an issue, fix it the first time you hear about it.

Value Employees 

Above all else, make your employees feel valued. If an employee works 40 hours a week, then you (the company) take approximately 24% of their time up by work alone. And if that employee sleeps an average of 8 hours a night, then about 57% of their week is either working or sleeping. Then the remaining 43% is spent eating, running errands, and spending time with family and friends. With such a significant amount of time at the office, reassure them that their work is valuable. Show them how they are contributing to the bottom line.

Start addressing turnover by recruiting a star quality team that is right for your organization. Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, and click here to access our  5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Cost of Turnover

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Cost of Turnover

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How HR Impacts Your Business

HR Impacts Your Business

Not too long ago, the Human Resource (“HR”) function was a clerical position that focused on helping the management team set appointments to interview prospect employees looking for work. Or they kept track of hours worked for a company. But those days are gone. HR impacts your business in ways that it once had no influence over. In fact, the HR role has evolved to include advancements in management, technology, and legal issues.

How HR Impacts Your Business

After having served as CEO and CFO for a couple different companies, I learned first hand that those two executive roles are really about managing people. Sure, we have our budgets, board meetings, bankers and analysts to deal with day-in and day-out. But what took up a significant part of my time in different companies was managing people.

Part of a wingman’s responsibility is to know what impacts your business. The CEO needs to know how every area, like HR, impacts your business. Click here to learn how to be the trusted advisor your CEO needs with our How to be a Wingman guide.

Science of Managing People

There are two sciences involved in managing people:

Psychology = the science of mind and behavior; the mental or behavioral characteristics of an individual or group

Sociology = the science of society, social institutions, and social relationships; specifically: the systematic study of the development, structure, interaction, and collective behavior of organized groups of human beings

We are clearly dealing with people in our management roles. As if that was not complicated enough, then add the legal system to that. This includes complex laws like the Affordable Health Care Act (“Obama Care”). Also consider things like American Disability Act (“ADA”), HIPPA, U.S. DOL,  Medicare, EEOC… And if you have a 401K or a pension plan, then you are regulated by a host of other laws and regulations.

Get the feeling yet? This is not a simple environment that can be administered by just an admin. The science of managing people requires a HR professional.

Today’s HR Function

Today, the HR function is a significant area of your business that needs a professional looking over it whether you outsource the HR function or if you are big enough to hire someone in house. Do not minimize this role in your business. HR professionals today have a variety of certifications and credentials and a good understanding of labor laws.

HR Impacts Your BusinessHow the HR Professional Works With Management 

Whether you are a small company of 20 employees or of 2,000 employees, your HR professional should be close to the executive team. In a typical company, this position may report to the CFO or even the CEO.  Executives: keep your HR professional close to you. Have at least a weekly standing meeting to discuss HR issues with that person. Have your HR partner develop and keep dashboards with key information that you want to see relate to your labor force. With the complexity of the HR regulations and labor laws, we need a cooler prevailing head to be at our side as management.

The larger your organization is and the more employees you have, this is ever more important. In addition, larger organization have more moving parts, and that includes HR. As an executive, having your pulse on the moral and culture of your organization is critical.

Have a pulse on the company and advise your CEO in their strategy and decision making. Click here to learn how to be the trusted advisor your CEO needs with our How to be a Wingman guide.

Managing Employee Turnover

In good times, we are building, hiring, growing, and asking more of your employees. You need to have your employees following you as the leader. In bad times, there is uncertainty, You are letting people go. You may also be asking more of  your employees. But you need to find the balance between not promising to much and asking employees to deliver. That is where a solid HR person will be worth their weight in gold. If you are a stable company that isn’t growing or shrinking, then you want to keep a stable workforce.

I recently saw a statistic that the cost in the U.S. of employee turnover is on average $65,000 per employee. Think about the loss of an employee and what it involves… Disrupted departments, time and cost of recruiting/training, learning curve for the new person. It really adds up. I have seen clients with high turnover, and they are simply bleeding cash. What is odd, is that I can’t believe that there are executives that simply live with the high turnover and do not address the issue.

Growing companies really need to keep HR at the top of the list. To be a successful growing company, you need to offer competitive benefits, develop policies, employee files and have a steady pipeline of additional resources when needed. There needs to be a lot of training so that employees follow company policies and labor laws. Believe it or not, State and Federal labor laws change frequently. As a result, your operations people must stay trained up to know what to do or not to do.

Quick Case Study

I was in a situation with close to 1,500 employees. The company entered into a financially distressed situation. We had to lay off half of the workforce while keeping the moral up for those staying behind. We restructured the operations of the business and shut down a whole division. Without a strong HR team, I am not sure we could have pulled it off. A reduction in force of that size involves special notices to cities, counties, and states. It involves severance benefits, angry people, sad people, and transitions of workload.

You can’t afford not to have an HR professional at your side, especially during drastic workforce changes.

The cost of violating the laws, regulations, or getting involved in a lawsuit around HR matters can be devastating to a company.  Not only is there a financial cost, but there is a branding and reputation cost as well. I once saw a large multinational company cancel a contract with a smaller supplier of supplies because the smaller supplier had pretty serious HR violations and was involved in litigation. The benefit of having the right HR partner at your side will far outweigh the cost. Your HR professional or financial leadership should be the wingman to the CFO. It’s time to step up into this trusted advisor role! Access our How to be a Wingman guide here.

HR Impacts Your Business

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Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO

One of our clients called us up because his DSO went from 34 days to over 72 days within a couple months. He couldn’t figure out what was causing his daily sales outstanding (DSO) to increase so dramatically in such a short time. When we came in the office to investigate, we found that there was significant turnover in the A/R and A/P staff. As a result, collections were not being consistently collected on. Turnover in collections is destroying your DSO. But how does turnover impact your DSO?

Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO

What happens when there is high turnover in a company? Decreased productivity, bad communication, reduced training, lost processes, and so much more. When we started working with our client mentioned above, they were turning over A/R personnel very quickly. At first, the management didn’t think about their DSO. Sales were going great! But no cash was being collected. What they originally thought was a cash flow problem became more of a management issue.

How are you managing your cash? After 25+ years of working with clients in cash crunches, we designed the A/R Checklist AND you can access for free here. Enjoy!

maintaining accurate records

What Happens When Turnover Is High The Collections Departments

Think about what happens when turnover is high in the collections department. Communication is not clear on who has been contacted, what to charge, if an invoice has been sent out, etc. It can easily get out of hand if communication is not seamless during the transition. There simply is no continuation and follow up.

You also need to address why turnover is high. Are you firing your employees? Are many employees retiring? Is morale down due to an upcoming transition? Are you not compensating them enough to stay? There is typically a reason for high turnover. But it may take some investigating. Do you have a good idea for what is an acceptable turnover rate?

Consider calculating the transaction turnover per A/R employee. If your number is low, you need to start improving the collections process.

      Number of Transactions Processed      
Number of Accounts Receivable Employees

Collections Cannot Be Automated

There’s a lot of things you can automate, but collections are not one of them. You cannot automate human behavior and nothing can replace a live call or meeting between two parties. While we may see some sort of automation built into this process, we don’t foresee it taking the humans out of this role. For example, if a client needs to explain that they need to extend their payment another week, they need a speak to a person, someone authorized to extend payment terms. Furthermore, if their contact person in A/R keeps changing, then those receivables will not be collected timely.  Management often underestimates the importance of having someone in receivables developing a relationship with the customer.

[HINT: Turnover may be high for a myriad of reasons, but your company still needs cash. Consider offering a discount to the client for paying in a certain number of days. Read more about discounting receivables here.]

 

How to Save Your DSO When Turnover is High

Your DSO is a key indicator for management to look at. But like other indicators, you need to know what impacts those variables and why. Employee turnover in A/R can directly impact DSO as those employees are the people responsible for collecting. When turnover is high, communications and processes don’t always get passed down properly or effectively. Let’s learn how to save your DSO when turnover is high.

Know the Cycle

First, you need to know the cycle. Companies (and economies) going through cycles where cash is tight, turnover is high, and credit becomes tight. .  Look at the recent oil & gas crisis. Oil price hit record highs, companies began to spend more, they took on more debt. Then the price of oil drops, companies find themselves paying for debt service based on a bigger size and larger revenue, cash gets tight.  The bank and other creditors tighten up until things get better down the road.

But if you’re experiencing high turnover that doesn’t reflect what the macro economy is doing, then you need to look internally.

Start by tracking your DSO at regular intervals. Make this part of your normal monthly reporting process.  This will give you a basis to predict cash flow and indicates when things are going south. When you create a DSO trend, it is easier to spot irregularity.

Identify Areas With Low Turnover

What areas in your company have low turnover? Is it sales, operations, upper level management, etc.? Identify the areas with low turnover. Regardless of their role in the company, someone needs to collect the cash or the company will be in trouble. For example, you have 5 sales people that have been there for an average of 15 years. Your A/R department has turned over 5 employees in the last 2 years. Choose one of your sales persons to manage the transition between A/R employees. Your sales people often have the relationship with the customer.

Write Down Your DSO Improvement Strategies

This is probably the most important step to saving your DSO when turnover is high. Write it down! A strategy isn’t a good strategy if you don’t write it down. Have written processes for collections as well as notes of what has been done for the entire accounting department will help everyone know where you are at.

Write the collections process down with all your DSO improvement strategies.

Then, write down notes from client conversations, steps in the collections processes. Have frequent internal meetings about collections.  Assign tasks to individuals and write down the progress or lack of progress.  The CFO should be made aware of collections, DSO and trouble accounts.

Improve Your DSO

Whether you are experiencing high turnover in your A/R staff or not, it’s important to continually improve your DSO. For more ways to add value to your company, download your free A/R Checklist to see how simple changes in your A/R process can free up a significant amount of cash.

Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO, Turnover in Collections

Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO, Turnover in Collections

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Laying Off Employees | Who stays in the lifeboat?

laying off employeesLet’s go back to 1912… The RMS Titanic set out on her first (and only) voyage from Great Britain to New York City on April 10, 1912. The plans were drawn. The lines were cast.  Some of the wealthiest people in the world were aboard. The well-oiled machine was pumping the turbines below, pressing forth to America. Everyone wanted to be apart of this enormous ship. Nothing could jeopardize something as perfect and indomitable as the Titanic.

Like any successful business, the Titanic relied on its business plans and well-run operations. But what happens when your company hits an unseen iceberg, tearing your business apart?

The “Situation”

Here’s the situation you’re faced with… The iceberg takes your ship out, forcing you as a leader to make radical decisions.

There’s only so much room in the lifeboats.  Your conscience says to put the women and children in the boats, but who will be strong enough to row?  There’s no easy solution.  In the end, someone is going to be left to brave the icy waters.

Let’s put this scenario in business terms.  You’ve hit an economic iceberg and you’re now forced to make the difficult decision of who you want in the lifeboat with you.  This snap judgement will impact either a few, or possibly thousands of livelihoods, depending upon the severity of the crisis and the size of your company.

Making The Decision

Ylaying off employeesour human capital, or employees, are one of the biggest expense items on your financial statements.  Hence companies often struggle with whether they should employ a large pool of people or downsize their company to the bare minimum.

Ivey Business Journal concluded that “downsizing [a company’s employees] has been a pervasive managerial practice for the past three decades.” As a result of downsizing, “layoffs cause firms to lose institutional knowledge about how to get things done, disrupt work relationships and patterns, and increase burdens on those who remain” (Harvard Business Journal). Workplace diversity is one of the many things that are impacted from laying off employees.

Business owners have a fiduciary responsibility to take care of the people in their company. There is nothing worse than letting people go. Is it Becky or John? Lisa or Lauren? Brent or Jackson? Especially for entrepreneurial companies, they are like part of your family.

It’s important to realize that you have to live to fight another day in the harsh waters. Even though it’s tough, the decision needs to be made to prevent your entire team from going under.

laying off employeesTide Rises & Falls

The tide in the oil and gas industry has fallen and is dragging along the ocean floor for an uncertain amount of time. Other industries are doing really well. The economy is constantly rising and falling which often results in layoffs during the low times.

Cisco Systems just recently announced that they had made the decision to lay-off 5,500 employees in their global enterprise. But when you realize that those 5,500 are only 7% of Cisco’s total workforce, it doesn’t seem like a lot – unless you were one of the employees let go.  Microsoft, Lloyds Bank, Intel, Avon and countless other companies have joined the ranks with Cisco in layoffs within the past 9 months.

Layoffs are something that you can expect, just like the tide rising and falling. Make the decision, knowing that everything will balance out.

Weather the Downturns

Start planning for your recovery in the downturns so that you can flourish after the storm passes by. Persevering through those hard decisions like laying off employees will pay off in the long-term.

Pull Yourself Back Into the Tide

Start by evaluating your employees. Use your key performance metrics that you use to measure employee success to determine your employees rankings. It’s not wise to just lay off the top 5% salaries because you’re concerned about cash. Pulling yourself back into the tide requires strength and grit and sheer determination. Make your evaluations based upon performance and skills, rather than compensation.

Who gets in the lifeboat?

Your company has taken a massive hit and the ship is going down.  Who do you want in the lifeboat to help you rebuild? We created three specific metrics that can make the analysis process of who stays and who goes a bit easier.

1.  Someone Who Increases Revenue

Find those employees that are holding themselves accountable as income producers. These employees will be thinking of new, creative ways to improve the sales process, increase revenue, drive new sales. Any position (accountant, supply chain manager, sales executive) needs to be mindful of what is coming into the funnel. If you can, find those entrepreneurial employees. They’ll be equipped with spark and energy to find a way in a dead end to help turn things around.

2.  Someone Who Cuts Costs

Stereotypically, accountants cut costs and only cut costs. But take a look at the bigger picture! Is there someone creating green initiatives that are increasing government funding? Are marketing managers converting from door hangers and mail-outs to digital marketing? Find someone who cuts costs anywhere. Those are the people (like those that increase revenue) that will find a way to make things happen.

3.  Someone Who Adds Value

Finally, you want someone on your lifeboat that can add value. While many can come in and increase revenue or cut costs, it takes a talented person to be able to add value to the company. Think of the bottom line.

Especially relevant in entrepreneurial companies, it is vital to add value. Bankers, investors, and employees will look to you as the owner or financial leader to add value to the company in a life-and-death situation.  You want someone in the lifeboat with you who makes that easier.

(Are you looking for someone that increases revenue, cuts costs, and adds value? Check out our free guide here to learn how to recruit a star-quality team.)

How to Avoid the Iceberg

Instead of consistently laying off employees during economically stressful times, there are 5 things that you need to key in on.

1.  Steer Your Ship

As a leader, financial or otherwise, it is imperative that you look at where you’re going. If you are staring down at your feet, then odds are you will crash. Look up and lead your company forward. Take note of anything changing immediately.

2.  Act Early

Acting as soon as you start see anything changing will prevent or minimize the chances of having a lifeboat situation.

Start by unlocking cash in your business. This is the easiest way to get some breathing room so you don’t need to start handing out pink slips.

3.  Cut Deep & Wide

Cut costs quickly and everywhere. There are several ways to dig deep and wide to prevent a lifeboat situation:

  1. Ask your employees to take a vacation.
  2. Cut back pay for a period of time with the understanding that previous pay will return once the crisis has passed.
  3. Reduce benefits.
  4. Offer part-time work instead of full-time work.
  5. Stop hiring.
  6. Communicate.

The last point is key, you must communicate.   Most employees will be willing to work with you if your expectations are reasonable and clearly communicated.  After all, they have a vested interest in the company remaining afloat as well.

4.  Have Enough Life Boats

Trees don’t grow to the sky and downturns don’t last forever.  Once you get back on dry land, make a plan for how to avoid the next iceberg, or at least minimize its impact.

What do wars and hurricanes have in common?  Once they’re over, smart people start planning for the next one.

5.  Start With A Star-Quality Team

Hiring is an important task. But so often, people take the approach of hiring fast and firing fast.  It’s no surprise that the #2 reason why businesses fail is because of employee turnover. Rather than trying to decide who to save, focus on hiring the right people in the first place so you don’t have to kick anyone out of the boat.

Interested in learning how to build a team you can’t live without?  Check out our free whitepaper 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team by clicking here.

 

laying off employees

laying off employees

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Business Issues Survey – Final Results

This time last year, we posted a survey asking you what business issues were causing you to lose the most sleep: 1) lack of training, 2) turnover, 3) cash flow, 4) managing growth, or 5) losses or declining profits.  We tallied the results as of June 2014 and posted them on our blog. We also re-opened the survey to see if anything had changed, or if the same issues were still causing insomnia.  The results of both surveys are summarized in the graph below.

Business Issues Survey Results

business issuesWhat’s really interesting to note is that while cash flow and declining profitability were among the most troublesome issues in the first survey, those issues took a backseat to personnel issues such as lack of training and high turnover in the second survey.  It would appear that as companies became more profitable and cash flow improved, employees became more optimistic and began to look for other opportunities leaving a talent void in their wake.

Unavoidable Business Issues

We included a “write-in” issue in the second survey whereby participants could list other issues that they were struggling with.  Once again, lack of talent and difficulty finding good people led the responses.

So what’s a company to do?

Business issues are unavoidable, but understanding how the resolution of one issue (lack of profitability) can give rise to another issue (turnover) is key to developing plans to mitigate these issues.

Download our three most powerful tools to take your business to the next level.

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What Business Issues Keep You Up?

As a business owner, I often find myself lying awake at night worrying about issues my company is facing.  Are we making as much money as we should be?  How is my cash flow?  Do I have the right team to grow the business?  These are just a few of the questions that cause me to lose sleep.

What Business Issues Keep You Up?

My guess is that I’m not alone in my insomnia, and I was curious to know what issues are keeping others up at night.  I put together a brief survey of some common business issues and solicited responses from my clients, colleagues, referral partners and members of our LinkedIn group.  I asked them to rate these issues on a scale of 0 (sleeping like a baby) to 5 (Ambien please!).  Here are the results so far:

 

up at night survey graph

 

Based upon these results, it appears that cash flow issues are currently demanding most of your attention.  Not surprisingly, managing growth comes in a close second as rapid growth is often the chief cause of cash flow problems.  I’m curious to see if turnover will become more of an issue as the economy continues to stabilize and employees begin to seek new opportunities.

What financial issues do you think are the most pressing for your company?  We’d love to have your input, so click here if you haven’t had a chance to submit your answers yet.  Stay tuned for updated results…

To learn more financial leadership skills download the free 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

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Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Is employee turnover a problem in all companies? All companies lose employees. It’s healthy for an organization to have a measurable turnover. Sometimes people don’t fit into a company’s culture. But other times, employees have emergencies or life changing experiences that separate them from the company.  However, it is not to say that a 0% turnover is automatically unhealthy. Some companies reach their optimal staffing level and go for months or years without any voluntary or involuntary turnover. In many situations, this is nearly impossible and would require more time and resources than is practical.

Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Tracking employee turnover is an essential key point indicator for most businesses. However, it is difficult to measure the costs associated with employees leaving. Hiring a new employee and transitioning away from the previous person is very costly. Some argue that the money lost during training is the key problem. While others recognize that the precious time that upper management must devote to interviewing and paperwork is the largest cost of all.

Each company will vary, and it will vary even more between industries. There are places to research whether your turnover rate is typical in comparison to other companies in your industry. For example, a quick search engine search with your NAICS code and “employee turnover” could give enough information to compare. Find your NAICS code here.  If not, more formal methods exist, such as using the Risk Management Association’s Annual Statement Studies. There is often free access to the large RMA book at local universities and small business development centers. You use your NAICS code to look up the data compiled about the different sized companies in that industry.

Do you have any opinions about employee turnover? Leave a comment below. For more information on this topic, check out Employee Turnover.

Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company by using our 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

is employee turnover a problem

is employee turnover a problem

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