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Behavior of Successful People

behavior of successful people

When researching the behavior of successful people, I came along an article regarding unsuccessful people. Steve Tobak wrote an article in Entrepreneur called 10 Behaviors You Never See in Successful People.  In his experience working with business owners over several decades, Tobak observed that behavior, as opposed to intrinsic characteristics or habits, determined whether an individual was successful or not.

Behavior of Successful People

In particular, he identified 10 behaviors that he never observed in successful people.  If you are looking to become a successful person, then you need to identify if you have behaviors of unsuccessful people. They include the following:

  1. Naivety
  2. Panic
  3. Fanaticism
  4. Laziness
  5. Quick-fix mentality
  6. Acting out
  7. Selfishness
  8. Living in the past or future
  9. Lighthearted indifference
  10. Oversensitivity

In the article, Tobak discusses (sometimes irreverently) why, over time, these particular behaviors will inevitably lead to failure.  Furthermore, probably my favorite quote of the piece is regarding laziness. Additionally, Tobak writes, “Most people are slackers. That’s why most people don’t achieve great things.  Simple as that.”

Click here to read the full article. Then come back and let me know what you thought of it. If you want to determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, then download your free white paper, 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Behavior of Successful People

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Behavior of Successful People

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How Not to Get the Interview

resumeWhen we’re conducting a CFO search for clients, it’s not unusual for me to read through (yes, I actually read them) hundreds of resumes looking for people I’d like to get to know better in an interview.  Through the process, I sometime feel a little like Goldilocks;  some resumes are too long and detailed, some are too brief, and some are just right.

How Not to Get the Interview

So what makes a “perfect” resume?  Every reviewer is different, but there are definitely some basic guidelines to follow to give you the best shot at making it to the interview round.   In his LinkedIn article, “The Biggest Mistakes I See on Resumes and How to Correct Them”, Laszlo Bock, SVP People Operations at Google, outlines 5 of the biggest “don’t”s when crafting your resume.  They are:

Typos

Either they bug you or they don’t.  Some people get really upset at the notion that an otherwise perfect candidate might not get chosen due to something as small as a typo in a resume. Bock’s point about typos is that some reviewers may interpret them as a lack of attention to detail. The fix is easy; proofread your resume from bottom to top or have a friend take a look with a fresh set of eyes.

Length

With resumes, less really is more. Not only does conciseness ensure your entire resume will be read, it demonstrates your ability to boil things down to their essence.  As Bock writes:

A crisp, focused resume demonstrates an ability to synthesize, prioritize, and convey the most important information about you. Think about it this way: the *sole* purpose of a resume is to get you an interview. That’s it. It’s not to convince a hiring manager to say “yes” to you (that’s what the interview is for) or to tell your life’s story (that’s what a patient spouse is for). Your resume is a tool that gets you to that first interview. Once you’re in the room, the resume doesn’t matter much.

Formatting

Your resume isn’t the place to get creative (unless you’re applying for a position in design or such).  Standard fonts, margins, spacing and such make for an easy-to-follow document that will get read in its entirety.  Reviewers know when you’re trying to cram a bunch of info on the page by using small margins or tiny fonts.  Bock also suggests saving your resume as a PDF for easy viewing across platforms.

Confidential Information

Trying to skirt or flagrantly violating confidentiality guidelines of current or former employers is a big no-no according to Bock.  After all, how can the prospective employer expect you to uphold their confidentiality rules if you’ve name-dropped in your resume?

Lies

Big or little, lies will always catch up with you.  Even if you get the position, you probably hope to be promoted some day and those little white lies will come back to haunt you.  It’s too easy these days for people to check up on you, so it’s not worth fudging, even just a little.

As I said before, all resume reviewers are different.  But avoiding common mistakes can help make sure that your resume gets full consideration. What do you think about Bock’s guidelines?  What would you add or subtract from the list?  Let me know your thoughts in the comments section below.

Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company using our 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

how not to get the interview

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how not to get the interview

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Workplace Diversity

See Also:
Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace
Co-employment in a PEO Arrangement

What is Workplace Diversity?

Diversity in the Workplace is a reality in most businesses and organizations. If organizations strive to improve their competitive advantage in the market, then they must learn how to successfully manage a diverse workforce.

Diversity Management

In a workplace, diversity management requires an environment of inclusion. Employees should feel like they make a significant contribution to the organization using their unique qualities. Diversity management is about taking advantage of people’s uniqueness and individuality. Then move the organization towards progress and success. Managing organizational diversity as an advantage and not as a disadvantage creates a united workplace culture. Drive it toward productivity and improvement.

Benefits of Diversity

The benefit of focusing on diversity and inclusion within an organization is that employees feel comfortable to participate and contribute their ideas. When employees feel appreciated for their individuality, they will think outside the box to help the organization grow. Diversity enables an organization to connect to different markets and to develop diversification of products, services, and strategies. The importance of diversity is that management can strategically maximize the abilities and productivity levels of individual employees.

Types of Workplace Diversity

  • Demographic Diversity includes diversity based on demographic background, such as ethnicity, gender, age, race, and disability status.
  • Experiential Diversity includes diversity based on life experiences, such as being a mother or father, an immigrant, a military veteran, or a former politician.
  • Informational Diversity includes diversity based on individual knowledge and educational backgrounds, such as a high school education versus an MBA education.
  • Fundamental Diversity includes diversity based on individual beliefs and values, such as importance of ethics in the workplace, as well as the relationships between employees and their organizations.

Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company using our 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Workplace Diversity

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Access your Recruiting Manual Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan recruit the best talent as well as avoid hiring duds.

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Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

Workplace Diversity

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Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Is employee turnover a problem in all companies? All companies lose employees. It’s healthy for an organization to have a measurable turnover. Sometimes people don’t fit into a company’s culture. But other times, employees have emergencies or life changing experiences that separate them from the company.  However, it is not to say that a 0% turnover is automatically unhealthy. Some companies reach their optimal staffing level and go for months or years without any voluntary or involuntary turnover. In many situations, this is nearly impossible and would require more time and resources than is practical.

Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Tracking employee turnover is an essential key point indicator for most businesses. However, it is difficult to measure the costs associated with employees leaving. Hiring a new employee and transitioning away from the previous person is very costly. Some argue that the money lost during training is the key problem. While others recognize that the precious time that upper management must devote to interviewing and paperwork is the largest cost of all.

Each company will vary, and it will vary even more between industries. There are places to research whether your turnover rate is typical in comparison to other companies in your industry. For example, a quick search engine search with your NAICS code and “employee turnover” could give enough information to compare. Find your NAICS code here.  If not, more formal methods exist, such as using the Risk Management Association’s Annual Statement Studies. There is often free access to the large RMA book at local universities and small business development centers. You use your NAICS code to look up the data compiled about the different sized companies in that industry.

Do you have any opinions about employee turnover? Leave a comment below. For more information on this topic, check out Employee Turnover.

Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company by using our 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

is employee turnover a problem

is employee turnover a problem

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Employee Turnover

See Also:
Is Employee Turnover a Problem?
Cost of Turnover
Demand for Talented People: Addressing Employee Turnover
Protect Yourself: A Guide to Non-Compete Agreements
Strategy for Managing Cash
Hiring Process is Getting Longer
Outsource Definition
PEO or Outsource Payroll

Employee Turnover Definition

Employee turnover, or staff turnover, is a measurement of how many employees are leaving a company. It’s a way to track whether a company has more employees leaving than is typically expected. This includes employees that either quit, were let go, or retired. However, companies that measure their employee turnover often separate these to manage each type of turnover.

Employee Turnover Ratio

When most refer to employee turnover rate, they are talking about the ratio of the total employees that leave during that time period. The ratio is often calculated on an annual basis and expressed as a percentage. For example, the industry standard for one business might be 5%, so you can compare each time period to the annual percentage. The business should examine each month’s percentage to see where the problem might be.

How to Calculate Employee Turnover

When calculating turnover, first make sure to group by different reasons for leaving and by job title. The more categories you break it down into, the more work it is. But the information will be more useful.

For example, if a car dealership separates the turnover rate among the salespeople and mechanics, it will be better able to isolate the issue. Another useful way to segment employees is by experience with the company or in the industry. This could show that a company needs to do a better job training new hires, or it could show a problem retaining the most experienced employees because of poor benefits.

Once you segment the company’s employees into useful groups, a simple calculation finds the turnover ratio or percentage. The calculation is the number of employees who have left divided by the total number of employees in that segment (# left in time period/# total employees in segment.) For example, if Company 1 lost one of its fifteen employees in one year, its annual turnover would be 6.67% or 1/15.

High Employee Turnover

What does high employee turnover mean? Depending what industry you are in, high turnover could mean a number of things. In a booming economy, it could mean that the job market is attractive enough to encourage job hopping. It could mean that the company is not hiring the best types of people for the position. In extreme situations, it could be a sign that the company is stagnating and is unattractive to new talent. In all cases, high turnover requires attention to the employees to find where the causes lie.

Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company using our 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

employee turnover

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Access your Recruiting Manual Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan recruit the best talent as well as avoid hiring duds.

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3 Critical Roles in Onboarding New Employees

Onboarding new employees is expensive and time-consuming for employers. In order for you to maximize the value of your onboarding process, following are three critical roles in onboarding new employees:

3 Critical Roles in Onboarding New Employees

Role of the Teacher

Onboarding new employees involves teaching them about the company culture and ethics as well as developing their skills and knowledge for the job.  We call this the development period. According to the specific position of the new employee, the company “trainer” should be prepared with the most effective training techniques. Most companies provide new employees with a training manual with important rules, instructions and reference information. The development period should be a smooth transition into the job position.   

Role of the Listener  

At the beginning of the onboarding process, trainers often unload a large amount of information on new employees in order to teach them what they need to know.  We call this the unloading period.  The trainers expect new employees to absorb the new information quickly. However, it is just as important for the trainers to be good listeners. By listening to employees and answering questions or concerns, the trainer can better understand the employee’s needs. In addition, they will know how to improve as a trainer.  Listening creates an environment of communication and understanding between individuals. This is mutually beneficial for both the company and its employees

Role of the Motivator 

The transition into a new job position and a new company can be challenging. We call this the adversity period.  It is vital that from the beginning of their time in the company, new employees have at least one motivator who supports them through hardships and helps them overcome challenges.  In order to train new employees successfully, the company trainer should know how to motivate and encourage new employees both in the good and difficult times.  An inspired employee with a good support system will not only be able to overcome adversity; but will also want to learn as much as possible and maximize his role to help the company succeed. 

If you want to determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, then download and access your free white paper, 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

 

Onboarding New Employees

Onboarding New Employees

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The Hiring Process is a Two-Way Street

Reading through resumes, interviewing candidates, and narrowing down to the ideal few candidates are critical aspects of hiring a new employeeEmployers may feel like they are always in full control. But the job candidates have a significant amount of control as well.  The hiring process is a two-way street.  A company creates a concise list of ideal candidates. Likewise, the best job candidates usually have a few potential companies as strong candidates to hire them.

The Hiring Process is a Two-Way Street

Before selling your ideal candidate on the job, make sure that you are confident that they are the right candidate for your job position.  In order for you to convince your ideal candidates to choose your company, remember this:

While you are interviewing them, they are interviewing you. 

Can you convince them of why your job position is the best fit for them? How can their talents and skills have a positive contribution to your company?  Can you offer them unique benefits that no other company can come close to? If you want the strongest, most desirable job candidates to choose you over other job opportunities, you need to inspire them in your company’s values, goals, and mission.

The hiring process is a two-way street.  While those strong job candidates are in your presence, realize that they are assessing you just as much as you are assessing them.  Make a unique impression so that your company is at the top of their list.

In order to determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, download and access your free white paper, 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

hiring process

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Access your Recruiting Manual Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan recruit the best talent as well as avoid hiring duds.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

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