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Sole Proprietorship

Sole Proprietorship Definition

The sole proprietorship definition is a private business owned and operated by one individual. Furthermore, a proprietorship is unincorporated and is not a legal entity separate from its owner. As a result, the owner earns all of the profits and incurs all of the losses from business operations. Therefore, the sole proprietor is legally liable for all of the activities and obligations of the business. For example, if the proprietorship defaults on debt obligations, the owner risks liquidation of personal assets.

Advantages and Disadvantages of a Sole Proprietorship

There are several advantages to the sole proprietorship. Proprietorships are easy to establish, easy to dissolve, and they give the owner a significant amount of operational freedom and flexibility. For tax purposes, the owner simply includes the profits or losses of the proprietorship with his or her individual tax filings.

There are also disadvantages. The owner has unlimited liability for the activities and obligations of the proprietorship. This puts the owner’s personal assets at risk. Also, because of the small scale of a proprietorship, it can be difficult to gain access to substantial capital resources and financing. As a result, this limits the growth potential of the enterprise.


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sole proprietorship

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sole proprietorship

See Also:
Partnership
General Partnership
Limited Partnership
S Corporation
How to Run an Effective Meeting

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Revocable Trust

See Also:
Pension Plans
Keogh Plan
Credit Life Insurance
401k
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

Revocable Trust Definition

A revocable trust is an agreement between a grantor and trustee where it transfers profit generating assets to the trustee. However, the grantor is still able to generate income from the assets. The grantor is also able to change the terms of the agreement at any point during his/her lifetime. This last point is the difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust.

Revocable Trust Meaning

Many use revocable trust estate planning to pass on a family company or perhaps some other part of the grantor’s estate to a revocable trust beneficiary. Beneficiaries are usually the grantor’s immediate family, but it can be anyone established within the contract. The main benefit is that the assets will be transferred to who the grantor desires. The grantor can still generate cash flow from the assets as well. Another primary benefit is that the grantor can change the terms at anytime to accommodate the grantor’s changing needs.

Revocable Trust Example

For example, Bob owns a bicycle shop chain named Pedal Bikes Co., which is a Sole Proprietorship. He has two sons and would like them to take over the company whenever he has passed away. Bob talked to his lawyer. The lawyer advised Bob that he should start up a revocable trust. The assets are then transferred to the newly formed Pedal Bikes Partnership under the revocable trust agreement. The two sons start running the chain while Bob comes into help them every now and then and provide oversight. Bob also receives payments from the company under the trust agreement.

When Bob passes away, the assets are then considered permanently transferred and are completely absorbed into the newly formed partnership. However, if one of Bob’s sons or both of them do not want to run the chain then Bob has the ability to change the terms of the contract to one of the sons or another party. This also insures that Bob receive payments in his later years and that his legacy lives on through his bike store chain.

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Bankruptcy Chapter 13

See Also:
Bankruptcy Costs
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy Code
Chapter 12 Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy Courts
Bankruptcy Information
Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy Chapter 13

Bankruptcy Chapter 13 is a type of bankruptcy proceeding outlined in the Bankruptcy Code. Furthermore, Chapter 13 is a financial reorganization procedure that applies to individual consumers and sole proprietorships.

When a financially distressed consumer or sole proprietor files for chapter 13 bankruptcy, the individual arranges to repay debt obligations with future income. Make monthly payments to a court-appointed trustee until you settle the debt. Usually, this occurs over a period of 3 to 5 years.

In addition, chapter 13 bankruptcy, individuals and sole proprietors are allowed to keep property they may have lost by filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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bankruptcy chapter 13

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