Tag Archives | retention

Cost of Turnover

See also:
Hire For Traits, Not For Talent
Corporate Zombies: Combat the Rise of Unengaged Employees
Millennials: The Hippies of the 21st Century
Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO

Cost of Turnover

If you take a look at any company’s income statement, you will notice that one of the largest expense items is salaries or compensation. While companies require employees to conduct business, it is expensive to have them. What happens when those employees leave? Many times, companies do not calculate the cost of turnover and how it impacts the bottom line.


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What is the Cost of Turnover?

The cost of turnover is the cost associated with turning over one position. This calculation includes the cost of hiring for that position, training the new employee, any severance or bonus packages, and managing the role when it is not filled.  Every company will experience some turnover. When a company has high employee turnover, they risk impacting the profitability of their organization, the culture, and the productivity.

Every organization should strive to retain their employees for as long as possible. If they see a uptick in employee turnover, then they should take action to reduce turnover and improve retention. This results in more efficient operations and higher profits.

How Turnover Impacts Profitability

Previously, we mentioned that turnover impacts profitability. There are various ways employee turnover impacts the profitability of a company, including employees picking up duties (overtime pay, injury, exhaustion, decrease productivity), the cost of hiring a new employee, and the overall state of the company’s culture. For example, a company that has a heavy presence on the web looses its marketing director. The current employees will have to figure out what that position actually did, pick up extra responsibilities, work overtimes, etc. If it was a planned departure (more than two weeks), then the transition may be more smooth; however, if it was an unexpected departure, then the company will be in a bind.

Now, it’s time to fill that vacant role. That takes time – especially, if you are slow to hire and quick to fire. In addition, the current hiring process is not cheap either. No matter where that employee lies on the income statement – in COGS or SG&A – employee turnover has a huge impact to the bottom line. Either, you experience a sales person that is not selling (decreased revenue and increased costs) or a support person that is just increasing costs.

Calculate the Cost of Turnover

So, how do you calculate the cost of turnover? First, know the primary costs that are associated to turnover 1 position. Those include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cost of hiring
  • Cost of training and/or onboarding
  • Any severance or bonus packages upon departure
  • Loss in productivity during vacancy
  • Errors in customer service
  • Loss of engagement from other employees

Use the following formula to calculate the cost of turnover:

Cost of Turnover = (Cost of Hiring + Cost of Onboarding and Training + Severance + Loss in Productivity) * Number of Employees Lost

Focus On Employee Retention

Turnover impacts profitability, so it is important that you focus on employee retention. There are several reasons to focus on employee retention, including consistency, the bottom line, culture, and reputation.

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Consistency

Consistency is key in any company. If your company is experiencing turnover in a client facing role, then turnover will cause more problems than profitability. For example, a consulting agency has 5 project managers in a year. The clients do not know who is there project manager or if anything is getting dropped or who to contact. It’s simply frustrating. In another example, a company looses all of its experienced team members within a few months. Now, they have new employees that are not familiar with the process, systems, team, or company. It will be hard for that company to gain any momentum without a consistent staff or a staff dominated by rookies.

Bottom Line 

On average, every time an employee leaves, it takes 6-9 months of salary to find a replacement. For example, if a person leaves and made $40,000, that’s anywhere between $20-30,000 of hiring and onboarding costs that were not previously anticipated. If you lose a higher level employee, then expect to pay more. The cost of turnover makes a dent in the bottom line.

Culture

How can you establish a company culture when your workforce is constantly changing? Establishing a good culture is difficult to do, but establishing a culture when there is no consistent workforce is near to impossible. We have seen how culture impacts the financial results of the company.

Reputation 

Beyond company culture, high employee turnover impacts the company’s reputation. Job seekers research the companies when applying to a position. If you cannot retain employees, then what does that say about your company? Your brand and reputation will be impacted by turnover. Unfortunately for the company, there are online resources such as Glassdoor that give employees and ex-employees a platform to give honest feedback about the company.


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Employee Retention Definition

The employee retention definition is the company’s ability to retain its current employees. If a company has a 95% retention rate, it means that the organization retained 95% of its employees for the given period. Every company should strive to improve their employee retention rate as it influences the culture and impacts the company’s profits.

Effective Employee Retention Strategies

The following includes effective employee retention strategies.

Establish Clear Goals and Expectations

First, establish clear goals and expectations. Employees become frustrated when they are unsure as to what their duties and expectations are. Communicate clearly with your team what your expectations are and what their responsibilities are. In addition, make goals together as a team. They will be more attainable, and everyone will be on the same page.

Offer Competitive Benefits

Among many reasons, studies rate salary as a top reason why employees leave a company. If your company is not able to exceed competitive benefits, then at least offer comparable benefits. Remember, salary is not the only reason why employees leave.

Culture

Culture is proven to impact the financial results of an organization. Establish a company culture that makes it enjoyable for your employees to work there. Some companies like Zappos are extremely customer centric. Other companies may offer flexible working environments (remote work, flex desks, etc.). Moreover, create a culture of open communication. The #1 reason why someone leaves a company is not because of salary, but it’s because of the manager. If there is an issue, fix it the first time you hear about it.

Value Employees 

Above all else, make your employees feel valued. If an employee works 40 hours a week, then you (the company) take approximately 24% of their time up by work alone. And if that employee sleeps an average of 8 hours a night, then about 57% of their week is either working or sleeping. Then the remaining 43% is spent eating, running errands, and spending time with family and friends. With such a significant amount of time at the office, reassure them that their work is valuable. Show them how they are contributing to the bottom line.

Start addressing turnover by recruiting a star quality team that is right for your organization. Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, and click here to access our  5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Cost of Turnover

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Cost of Turnover

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Culture Drives Financial Results

culture drives financial results

As social media and search engines become more intelligent and prevalent, companies are battling the image that others outside the organization see as well as what employees feel. Entrepreneur Magazine even said that, “Company culture is more important than ever. It’s not that company culture was ever unimportant, but it’s quickly proving to be a “must-have” rather than a “nice-to-have.”” Have you ever worked in a company that had a bad culture? I have. I counted down the minutes until I could leave the office. Work for me was not enjoyable. As the financial leader of the company, I was not focused on driving financial results. Simply put, culture drives financial results.

Culture starts with your team. Before you add anyone else into your organization, click here to access your free 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

How Company Culture Drives Financial Results

Before we get into how company culture drives financial results, what is culture? Investopedia defines culture as “the beliefs and behaviors that determine how a company’s employees and management interact and handle outside business transactions.” In other words, you cannot say and it be with culture. Culture is organically developed over months or years. It depends on how is in the organization and how the organization acts as a whole through trials and successes.

Culture is also often created by the corporate governance and leadership of the organization. The tone starts at the top. Cultural changes happen also, especially when there is a change in ownership. A change in ownership can bring a change in governance, personalities, processes, and even language. Depending on the complexity of business, it may take from one year to three years to really complete an integration of an acquisition. The leadership of the organization must know what is going on in the culture of the organization as this has a direct effect on the bottom line.

Increased Performance

If employees are happy in an organization, then they will have increased performance. Some of the causes of increased performance stems from increased flexibility, professional development, and knowing that they are making their mark on the world.

Millennials are the largest generational cohort in the workforce in today’s world. As a result, they are spreading their desires in the workplace to other generations. For example, they value flexibility – the ability to work remotely, to have a standing desk, to work in a co-working space, to have odd-hours instead of the 9-5.

Additionally, they want to be further trained and develop. I once had an employee who told me that they didn’t care about the money if they were able to get professional development. At first, I was hesitant to provide that extra training because they were just going to leave me for more money after I had invested. But that employee didn’t leave. In fact, that employee was the most loyal in my organization.

Millennials are a funny generation! They definitely think outside the box and often bring ideas that the “traditional” worker would have not thought about. A good leader needs to know what drives his employees. What I have learned is that they want to know they are making a difference in people’s lives. They want to know that they are doing more good than harm. This could be supporting the homeless community or sponsoring an orphan. Or it could be storytelling how the organization’s efforts changed a customer’s life. It’s a simply thought, but when you expand work outside of the four walls of your office, those employees have more purpose and passion about their work. Thus, increasing their performance.

culture drives financial results

Increased Productivity

Additionally, you can also expect increased productivity from good company cultures. Think about Google and their office environment. With ping pong tables, napping pods, and playful environments, employees are told that they can have fun. Many times, entrepreneurs and executives think that working hard 8-12 hours a day will result in incredible results. But the employees feel like they can’t relax. There’s increased stress, decreased productivity, and eventually high turnover.

Increased Retention

Staffing, recruiting, hiring, and talent acquisition is both costly and time consuming. When you factor in the time to review resumes, interview, hire, train, onboard, then pay and provide benefits, that individual is an expensive asset on your financial statements. A good company culture will keep and retain those talented assets.

Looking to add more people to your team? Before you start recruiting, download our free 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Examples of Company Culture Driving Financial Results

One of our team members once helped transition a company through a merger. All hands were on deck. There was no room for mistakes. And every client of theirs seemed angry. The product was great. Clients had great success from implementing the products. But it was clear there was something severely wrong! Employees were either fired or they quit. Within several months after the merger was official, the company was in financial distress. What we found that it wasn’t pricing or the product… Instead, it was the company culture! A good culture has gone bad.

Another example comes from a study that focused on the financial results of companies with and without performance-enhancing cultures. Needless to say, there is a strong correlation between company culture and growth. In the book Corporate Culture and Performance, John Kotter argues “that strong corporate cultures that facilitate adaptation to a changing world are associated with strong financial results.” When we talk about company culture driving financial results, it’s impacts more than just profit – but the shareholders, employees, and economy.

It’s Start With Who You Hire

Zappos has been known for its culture and prides itself in attributing its success to its corporate culture. What they have realized is that it starts with who you hire. Instead of looking at a resume for credentials, the recruiters essentially court them in a relationship. Similarly, we frequently say to our clients that if you can’t have lunch with a potential hire, do not hire them. When you take an employee out of an office and into the real world, you see how they really perform. Are they rude to the waiter? Or are they patient and kind? Do they hold the door open for people or let it fall in their faces?

For example, the CFO position should have discretion, responsibility, and confidence. If they show up to the wrong coffee shop for a meeting due to assumptions or carelessness or if they are indecisive in choosing a meal, then you need to assess whether they are capable for the position of CFO.

Personality Over Credentials

We once had a client that emphasized that trust was by far the most important quality for their CFO to have. It didn’t matter if they had X, Y, and Z qualifications. In fact, the CEO would rather hire someone who maybe wasn’t as qualified but he could trust over someone who was both qualified and untrustworthy. Especially when considering those high level positions, chose personality over credentials. Obviously, we are not saying to hire someone that cannot do their job. But if you had to decide between two candidates with similar credentials, chose the one that will fit your culture the best.

Be Slow to Hire & Quick to Fire

Bad employees can be a huge drain on resources and can potentially cause more damage than anticipated. That’s why the best corporate cultures are slow to hire and quick to fire. Those entities are protecting their most valuable intangible assets. In order to determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, download and access your free 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team whitepaper.

culture drives financial results

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Construction Accounting

See Also:
Progress Billing for a General Contractor
Cash Flow Statement
How to Select Your Commercial Insurance Broker
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
Financial Ratios

Construction Accounting Definition

Construction accounting, a type of project accounting, is the method for financially tracking the progress of a construction job. This is essential for bidding, request-for-proposals, project management, invoicing, construction retention payments, and more.

The process of construction accounting management involves monitoring both costs and revenues. Costs fall into 3 main categories: Direct (Direct Labor, Direct Materials, etc.); Indirect (Indirect Labor, Indirect Materials, etc.); and selling, general, and administrative.

To account for revenue, compare the expected project value to the approximate percentage of completion of the project. Over time, you will receive cash with completion invoices. A final payment made upon satisfactory completion of the job. The construction retainer is the final payment because it retains the contractor until that the project is completed.

Construction accounting and financial management involves monitoring draw, progress billing, work-in-progress, and a slew of construction accounting methods which range from GAAP compliant to industry-specific. Generally, the industry has accepted a series of unique methods of financial reporting that are not present anywhere else. These aid in construction accounting and taxation.

Construction Retention Definition

Construction retainage is the final amount of payment kept, by the customer, to ensure satisfactory completion of a project. In both residential and commercial construction, construction retainage is also referred to retention money. Although it is extremely common to the construction world, you can use this method of quality control in other places.

In the world of construction, retention accounting occurs in a similar method as above. Projects are paid with increasing completion until finished. Then, the customer will examine the project, with the project manager, to ensure that it meets their needs. The customer makes the final payment once this is agree upon. To contractors and other workers in construction, this is when retention release has occurred.

Laws exist to protect the investment of the customer as well as the contractor. Laws vary from state to state. An attorney that is experienced with construction retention laws should deal with any discrepancies. In the event of unacceptable or negligent construction, recovery of the retainage is a possibility. Maintain every document and record for each client and each project so that in the event of a disagreement, you will have support to your case.

Construction Accounting Example

The founder of Cabinetco, a custom cabinetry builder, is Maggie. Her projects, pieces of art in their own right, have continuously pleased customers. Maggie, over time, has become well versed in the process of accounting for her projects.

Maggie begins her projects with a Request-for-proposal, or RFP. Her records of past projects allow her to closely estimate the total cost of each new project. Upon this foundation Maggie makes a bid for the estimated cost of each project. In her experience, customers are always pleased when they pay less than the estimate. Therefore, Maggie makes sure to present customers an estimated cost which will be less than her billed price. She does this with a keen eye so as to ensure consistent profitability on each project.

Maggie knows that her bid price does not drive her business: customers do. She has made great efforts to present excellent work and has created happy customers. Word-of-mouth is her most effective marketing message. This leverage allows her to negotiate the lowest retainage payment possible. Maggie knows the importance of cash flow in the survival of her business.

How To Account on Long Projects

Once Maggie has confirmed her bid with a customer she begins building. She then orders the perfect materials and has a trusted team to subcontract her building. Her role in this process is as a project manager. Her ability to control quality drives word-of-mouth recommendations to Cabinetco.

On long projects Maggie sends regular invoices. These state the percentage of completion on the project, the payment due for that level of completion, expected date to the next invoice or benchmark, and other details.

Maggie, finally, presents the project to the customer. She knows that every time she sees a happy face she is retaining customers as well as defining her brand. She then sets a date for final completion and invoices for her project retainage.

Maggie has cracked the code to success in her business. To her, it is about accountability, over-delivering, and project management.


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construction accounting

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