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Is Your Business Bankable?

Is Your Business Bankable

Businesses call us for many reasons but here are two very common reasons why we get called: they are growing and want to strengthen the financial function OR they are in financial distress and can’t find a way out. Why does a business need to be bankable? What does being bankable mean? In this blog, we are going to answer all those questions and advise you how to strengthen your banking relationship (something all businesses need to do).

What metrics are you using to gage your company’s performance? It’s important to identify and track those KPIs. Need help tracking them? Click here to access our KPI Discovery Cheatsheet, and start tracking those KPIs today!

Is Your Business Bankable?

Before we answer the question “is your business bankable?”, what does bankable even mean? Bankable is a financial jargon that indicates that a business is sufficiently healthy to receive interest from lenders to loan. It’s a basic indicator of a company’s success. If a bank is willing to loan a business cash and/or support a business, then the risk of it failing or not paying is low. A bankable company has significant assets, profits, liquidity (cash), and collateral.

An article from Forbes says it like this, “The bank is your cheapest, but often most difficult, source of capital with which to operate and grow your company.”

So, is your business bankable? There are several things to consider. Financial health will be the primary focus of determining if your business is bankable. There are other things, such as collateral and the character of the person, behind the loan.

Financial Things to Look for

Financial things to look for:

Non-Financial Things to Look for

Non-financial things to look for include the following:

  • Do you have a strong management team?
  • What does your industry or segment look like (strong, declining, etc.)?
  • Do you have a business plan?
  •  The character of the people behind the company and signing the loan documents
  • Will you provide a personal or corporate guarantee?

If you are unsure, then just ask your banker.

Is Your Business BankableThe Need to be Bankable

We deal with companies that are both highly successful or maybe in a distress situation. If you are successful, then you may want to acquire another company, have a distribution, or invest in CAPEX. In today’s market of relatively cheap access to capital, why would you use your own cash? If you are growing, then you really need to consider a line of credit to help you grow. We see very successful companies in a high growth scenario bleed out of cash and working capital. In those cases, a line of credit would make life so much easier.

 Click here to access our KPI Discovery Cheatsheet, and start tracking your progress to be bankable!

Bankable Business Plan

Now, that you have determined if you are bankable or not bankable, it’s time to put together a bankable business plan. There are several things that banks (and investors) want to see before they invest in your and your company. There are ten sections to a bankable business plan.

(HINT: If you do not have a good banking relationship with your banker, then even the most perfect business plan will not guarantee you will get the capital or line of credit you need/want.)

Value Definition

What ares in your business create value? In a bankable business plan, you need to define your value-generating centers (core-business activities). A successful business will continue to come back to the value that they provide to customers; however, an unsuccessful business will continue to get distracted by other areas of the business that are not generating any or as much value.

Needs Assessment

A Needs Assessment identifies the company’s priorities. It also defines what needs to be accomplished and the steps that need to be taken to achieve the goals. This is a great tool to use to identify what you know and don’t know about your business. Use this process to analyze every part of your business. Score.org provides a Needs Assessment that will gage how well you know your business and your needs.

Differentiation and Competitive Assessment

Porter’s Five Forces of Competition is used in the differentiation and competitive assessment to identify competing products/services and to start the process of differentiating yourself from the competitors. For example, there are 3 companies in Houston that provide the exact same product; however, ABC Co. is working to be bankable. So ABC Co. works to position their product differently and to provide more value than their competitors. Without conducting a differentiation and competitive assessment, ABC Co. risks loosing valuable market share.

Market Analysis

Bankers want to mitigate their risk. Conduct a market analysis to explain exactly that your market is doing. Is it new and expanding? Or is it saturated and declining? This will help explain your company’s growth potential.

Marketing Planning

Put together a marketing plan. Identify how you are going to market your product or service, what your target market is, and how you are going to continue to grow.

Sales and Promotion Strategy

Now, that you have built out your marketing plan, identify your sales and promotion strategy. For example, if a $1 trial for a subscription is critical to your sales strategy, then write that out and explain how it has contributed to your company’s growth.

Organization Design

What does your organization look like? Are you bombarded with too many non-essential personnel or administrative functions? Or is your company designed to optimize all positions to cover both value-adding functions and administrative functions?

Financing Needs

Identify your financing needs. How much do you need to sustain your company? How quickly do you need financing? Answer all this questions

Financial Projections

Next, build out your financial projections. Be sure not to have optimistic projections that are hard to near impossible to accomplish. They need to be realistic, detailed and logical.

Risk Analysis

Finally, what risk does your company have? For example, a company who relies heavily on the oil and gas industry needs to identify what risk they will face if that industry declines.

Conclusion

In conclusion, being bankable is a measurement of success. As previously stated, there are several things you need to watch to remain bankable and profitable. Measure and track those KPIs. Click here to download our free KPI Discovery Cheatsheet.

Is Your Business Bankable
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Is Your Business Bankable

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Cost of Turnover

If you take a look at any company’s income statement, you will notice that one of the largest expense items is salaries or compensation. While companies require employees to conduct business, it is expensive to have them. What happens when those employees leave? Many times, companies do not calculate the cost of turnover and how it impacts the bottom line.


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What is the Cost of Turnover?

The cost of turnover is the cost associated with turning over one position. This calculation includes the cost of hiring for that position, training the new employee, any severance or bonus packages, and managing the role when it is not filled.  Every company will experience some turnover. When a company has high employee turnover, they risk impacting the profitability of their organization, the culture, and the productivity.

Every organization should strive to retain their employees for as long as possible. If they see a uptick in employee turnover, then they should take action to reduce turnover and improve retention. This results in more efficient operations and higher profits.

How Turnover Impacts Profitability

Previously, we mentioned that turnover impacts profitability. There are various ways employee turnover impacts the profitability of a company, including employees picking up duties (overtime pay, injury, exhaustion, decrease productivity), the cost of hiring a new employee, and the overall state of the company’s culture. For example, a company that has a heavy presence on the web looses its marketing director. The current employees will have to figure out what that position actually did, pick up extra responsibilities, work overtimes, etc. If it was a planned departure (more than two weeks), then the transition may be more smooth; however, if it was an unexpected departure, then the company will be in a bind.

Now, it’s time to fill that vacant role. That takes time – especially, if you are slow to hire and quick to fire. In addition, the current hiring process is not cheap either. No matter where that employee lies on the income statement – in COGS or SG&A – employee turnover has a huge impact to the bottom line. Either, you experience a sales person that is not selling (decreased revenue and increased costs) or a support person that is just increasing costs.

Calculate the Cost of Turnover

So, how do you calculate the cost of turnover? First, know the primary costs that are associated to turnover 1 position. Those include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cost of hiring
  • Cost of training and/or onboarding
  • Any severance or bonus packages upon departure
  • Loss in productivity during vacancy
  • Errors in customer service
  • Loss of engagement from other employees

Use the following formula to calculate the cost of turnover:

Cost of Turnover = (Cost of Hiring + Cost of Onboarding and Training + Severance + Loss in Productivity) * Number of Employees Lost

Focus On Employee Retention

Turnover impacts profitability, so it is important that you focus on employee retention. There are several reasons to focus on employee retention, including consistency, the bottom line, culture, and reputation.

Learn how to be a financial leader who increases employee retention in their organization with our execution plans, whitepapers, webinars, office hours, and so much more in the SCFO Lab.

Consistency

Consistency is key in any company. If your company is experiencing turnover in a client facing role, then turnover will cause more problems than profitability. For example, a consulting agency has 5 project managers in a year. The clients do not know who is there project manager or if anything is getting dropped or who to contact. It’s simply frustrating. In another example, a company looses all of its experienced team members within a few months. Now, they have new employees that are not familiar with the process, systems, team, or company. It will be hard for that company to gain any momentum without a consistent staff or a staff dominated by rookies.

Bottom Line 

On average, every time an employee leaves, it takes 6-9 months of salary to find a replacement. For example, if a person leaves and made $40,000, that’s anywhere between $20-30,000 of hiring and onboarding costs that were not previously anticipated. If you lose a higher level employee, then expect to pay more. The cost of turnover makes a dent in the bottom line.

Culture

How can you establish a company culture when your workforce is constantly changing? Establishing a good culture is difficult to do, but establishing a culture when there is no consistent workforce is near to impossible. We have seen how culture impacts the financial results of the company.

Reputation 

Beyond company culture, high employee turnover impacts the company’s reputation. Job seekers research the companies when applying to a position. If you cannot retain employees, then what does that say about your company? Your brand and reputation will be impacted by turnover. Unfortunately for the company, there are online resources such as Glassdoor that give employees and ex-employees a platform to give honest feedback about the company.


Download The Free 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team


Employee Retention Definition

The employee retention definition is the company’s ability to retain its current employees. If a company has a 95% retention rate, it means that the organization retained 95% of its employees for the given period. Every company should strive to improve their employee retention rate as it influences the culture and impacts the company’s profits.

Effective Employee Retention Strategies

The following includes effective employee retention strategies.

Establish Clear Goals and Expectations

First, establish clear goals and expectations. Employees become frustrated when they are unsure as to what their duties and expectations are. Communicate clearly with your team what your expectations are and what their responsibilities are. In addition, make goals together as a team. They will be more attainable, and everyone will be on the same page.

Offer Competitive Benefits

Among many reasons, studies rate salary as a top reason why employees leave a company. If your company is not able to exceed competitive benefits, then at least offer comparable benefits. Remember, salary is not the only reason why employees leave.

Culture

Culture is proven to impact the financial results of an organization. Establish a company culture that makes it enjoyable for your employees to work there. Some companies like Zappos are extremely customer centric. Other companies may offer flexible working environments (remote work, flex desks, etc.). Moreover, create a culture of open communication. The #1 reason why someone leaves a company is not because of salary, but it’s because of the manager. If there is an issue, fix it the first time you hear about it.

Value Employees 

Above all else, make your employees feel valued. If an employee works 40 hours a week, then you (the company) take approximately 24% of their time up by work alone. And if that employee sleeps an average of 8 hours a night, then about 57% of their week is either working or sleeping. Then the remaining 43% is spent eating, running errands, and spending time with family and friends. With such a significant amount of time at the office, reassure them that their work is valuable. Show them how they are contributing to the bottom line.

Start addressing turnover by recruiting a star quality team that is right for your organization. Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, and click here to access our  5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Cost of Turnover

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Cost of Turnover

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Customer Profitability

Customer Profitability Definition

The customer profitability definition is “the profit the firm makes from serving a customer or customer group over a specified period of time, specifically the difference between the revenues earned from and the costs associated with the customer relationship in a specified period” (Wikipedia). In other words, customer profitability focuses on the profitability of a specific customer. How much revenue do they bring in? How much time, resources, etc. do they require from your company? By calculating the profitability of each customer, you have some great business insights on productivity, resource allocation, etc.

For example, if your customer service department is overwhelmed with work, then you can assess the number of requests per paying client. If a customer that is at the towards the bottom for revenue and the top for requests, then you can conclude several things. Those can include that you need to either increase their price, fire that customer, or limit the amount of requests for that customer.


Click here to Download the Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide


The Purpose of Measuring Customer Profitability

Customer profitability is a key metric utilized to inform decision making in various areas of the company. These decisions affect the value exchange between the customer and the company. Once we measure the profitability of our customers, we are now able to understand who our customers are and how we make a profit. It can provide great insights on the business that lead to focusing on what is best for the customer.

How to Measure Customer Profitability

Before you measure the profitability of customers, you need to confirm how your company calculates revenue and expenses. Remember, Profit = Revenue – Expenses. Some companies recognize revenue when it is received (cash basis accounting). But we recommend that organizations use accrual basis accounting – or recognize revenue when it is earned. If you are bigger than a hot dog stand, then you should be using accrual accounting. In regards to expenses, it’s also important to allocate as many expenses through the customer as possible. Think about capital, debt, operational costs, etc.

Once you have figured out the respective revenue and expenses for a specific customer, then you are able to calculate its profitability. Next, you need an analysis all of your customers.

Customer Profitability Key Performance Indicators

There are various KPI’s that can help you understand how your customer profitability is doing at the moment. Here are examples of a few:

Average Revenue Per User (ARPU)

A measurement of the average revenue generated by each user or subscriber of a given service. Use the following formula to calculate the average revenue per user (ARPU):

 Total Revenue / Total # of Subscribers 

Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)

A projection of the entire net profit generated from a customer over their entire relationship with the company. Use the following formula to calculate the customer lifetime value (CLV):

Annual profit per customer X Average number of years that they remain a customer – the initial cost of customer acquisition

If your customer isn’t valuable or is costing you too much, then reassess your pricing. Click here to learn how to price for profit with our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

Customer Profitability Analysis

Customer analysis, defined as the process of analyzing customers and their habits, is one of the most important areas of study in a business.

By observing the actions of various customers you start to see a trend of what your average customer is like and what their habits look like. This is a hint at who your target market could be. Behavioral trends amongst customers are important in how your company decides to carry on their marketing efforts. Once you analyze your customer base and determine your most profitable customers it is important to allocate the majority of your efforts towards them to make your most profitable customer your target customer.

Managing Customer Profitability

Managing customer profitability is larger than just the sales or fulfillment of product/service for the customer. It also includes marketing, finance, customer service, product, and operations. If you manage the profitability of customers, then you will have a better chance of catching areas of inefficiencies.

Areas to Improve Profitability

Some ways to improve customer profitability are to change the way you provide commission to the salesperson. Instead of paying their commission based on revenue, base it on the profitability. This can either be focused on the margin percentage (i.e. a sliding scale) or on the dollar amount in profits.

Why It’s Important to Manage

Managing customer profitability is important for various reasons, not only does it set you apart from the competition by providing more value to your customers, but it also improves the company’s revenues. When you manage customer profitability you are making the value exchange from company to customer more efficient and more profitable.

If you are looking for other ways to improve profitability, then download our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

customer profitability definition

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Invest in Leadership Development

When you invest in leadership development, you are making an investment. It’s something that you pay good money for and expect a return on your investment. But what many leaders don’t realize is that leadership development should be strategic. We once had a coaching participant (CFO) who worked in a family company. Once the CEO retires, the CFO is set to become the CEO. Instead of going into the job blind or get coaching at the wrong time, this individual sought out coaching before he was set to take over the company. So, why invest in leadership development in the first place?

Invest in Leadership Development

Why Invest in Leadership Development

People will always be a good investment. Why? Because without people, you will not be able to accomplish all  of your goals for your company. There’s a phrase… The tone starts at the top or the fish rots from the head down. Whichever phrase you prefer, it hints at the same thing. Success (or failure) is a result of the leadership of a company. If you want a future for your company, then you need to focus on your leadership and management. You can accomplish this in 2 ways – 1) hire good leaders and 2) invest in leadership development for existing company leaders.

A legal entity should stand on its own no matter what changes are made at the top. There should always be a succession plan whereby management should be able to step up to executive roles. Without investing in your team, this will not happen.

The second option rides on the fact that you have already invested in a current employees with their compensation, benefits, etc. Now, it’s time to get them the coaching they need to further increase their value to your company.

 To learn more financial leadership skills, download the free 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

Reasons to Invest in Leadership Development

There are several reasons to invest in leadership development including improving profitability, retaining talent, and improving return on investment. Harvard’s research report on The State of Leadership Development discusses how leadership development addresses the “demands for change to address threats from global competition and technology-driven upstarts; the need to engage a multigenerational workforce with a range of work styles; and the imperative to cultivate a new generation of leaders who can meet these needs and thrive.” Simply put, companies need to address competition, culture, work styles, and generational differences to compete on a global scale.

Improve Profitability

If your leaders know how to improve profitability with the tools, resources, and second-hand experience from a leadership development program, then they will become evermore valuable to your firm. Leadership development will coach them how to make strategic decisions, how to lead effectively, and how to find opportunities. All of those benefits have the opportunity to improve profitability.

Day 2 of the Financial Leadership Workshop is all about improve profitability and cash flow. Click here to learn more, then contact us to register for the next series.

Retain Talent

In addition, companies cannot motivate all people by money. In fact, financial gain isn’t the only thing many employees negotiate. The next “gain” many negotiate for is mentorship, training, coaching, and further leadership development. That should tell you something. We all know the cost of turnover is high and can potentially make a dent in profitability. Your company’s goal should be to retain talent for as long as possible.

Improve Return on Investment

Many leadership development programs do not effectively communicate how they are going to improve return on investment. A good CFO or financial leader should be able to increase value 1-2% of sales in profits. For example, if a company has $1mm in sales, then a CFO should be able to increase profitability at least $10-20,000. And it goes up from there! If the investment is greater than 1-2% of sales, then I would advise you to find a different program. How much return can you expect from investing in your leaders? Financial leaders should always be looking at ways of adding value.

Financial Leadership Development

More specifically, your financial leadership needs to be further developed in their leadership skills. In our Financial Leadership Workshop, I enable my students to go beyond the role of CFO/CEO to become the central financial leader in the company. Furthermore, our curriculum empowers you to become both an influence and decision maker in your company.

Any financial leadership development program worth investing in should accomplish a couple things. It should make the shift from numbers cruncher to financial leader. It should also cover how technology changes the role. Obviously, it should address profits and cash flow. There are many other topics that I could list here, but you can read more about what you should be prepared to walk away from a coaching workshop here.

Finding the Right Financial Leadership Development Program

It all starts with who is coaching the program. For example, if a 26-year old with no financial executive experience began coaching financial leadership, then there would be no credibility or experience behind that program. In comparison, if the course is coached by a 28-year financial executive who is seasoned and experienced either in a niche market or a variety of markets, then the only thing you need to look for is the fit. Finding the right financial leadership development program begins with the curriculum. Does it coach on the topics you need to coached up on? If so, then you need to also evaluate the following:

  • Logistics (time, location, schedule, etc.)
  • Cost
  • Benefits
  • The Coach

Right now, registration is open for our Financial Leadership Workshop Gamma Series starting this October. Click here to learn more about our program and contact us to see if it’s the right fit for you.

In the meantime, I also wanted to gift you our 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs. This whitepaper is by far our most popular whitepaper and is just a snippet of what to expect in our Financial Leadership Workshop.

Invest in Leadership Development

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ROCE (Return on Capital Employed)

See Also:
ROE (Return on Equity)
ROIC (Return on Invested Capital)

ROCE (Return on Capital Employed) Definition

ROCE stands for Return on Capital Employed; it is a financial ratio that determines a company’s profitability and the efficiency the capital is applied. A higher ROCE implies a more economical use of capital; the ROCE should be higher than the capital cost. If not, the company is less productive and inadequately building shareholder value.

ROCE Formula

Use the following formula to calculate ROCE:

ROCE =  EBIT/Capital Employed.

EBIT = Earnings Before Interest and Tax
Capital Employed = Total AssetsCurrent Liabilities.

Calculating Return on Capital Employed is a useful means of comparing profits across companies based on the amount of capital. It is insufficient to look at the EBIT alone to determine which company is a better investment. You also have to look at the capital and calculate the ROCE. Many consider ROCE a more reliable formula than ROE for calculating a company’s future earnings because current liabilities and expenses.


Are you trying to maximize the value of your company? The first thing to do is to identify “destroyers” that can impact your company’s value. Click the button to download your free “Top 10 Destroyers of Value“.

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ROCE Example

Look at the following table to see the importance ofReturn on Capital Employed (ROCE) in action.

Return on Capital Employed

Both Company A and Company B sell computers. Company A represents the Old Factory model; they are a distribution company that sells business to business. Company B is the New Factory; they are also a distribution company, but they sell on the Internet via credit card. Due to this modern convenience, Company B is able to receive payment within two days instead of the forty-five it takes Company A.

If you were to just consider EBIT, then Company A looks like the better investment at 7% return on sales compared to Company B’s 5%; however, with such a large DSO number, Company A is out $6,000,000 more than Company B at any given time. This means Company B needs less capital invested in the company which would result in a higher return on equity (ROE).

Thirty years ago, a similar scenario played out between IBM (Company A) and Dell (Company B). In his college dorm room, Michael Dell started taking credit card sales over the phone and was able to grow a billion dollar company with very little capital.

If you don’t leave any money on the table, then access our Top 10 Destroyers of Value to discover what areas of your business need to be attended to.
Return on Capital Employed

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Return on Capital Employed

(Originally published by  on June 9, 2016)

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Realizing Profit Potential

Over the years, we have asked our clients what business issues keep them up at night. Consistently, realizing profit potential was one of the top issues that kept business owners up at night. Is there money left on the table that hasn’t been realized? Is there potential that hasn’t been capitalized on yet? As a financial leader, it’s your job to maximize the profitability of your company.

Realizing Profit PotentialWhat is Profit Potential?

Profit potential indicates the capacity for a company to make more money in future business and trading transactions. I like referring to it as the monetization of your total capacity to drive earnings. Furthermore, profit potential measures the profit a company can achieve if all their operations are at peak efficiency. This includes pricing, efficiencies, operations, turnover, etc. Also, look at profit potential as the maximum revenue with the lowest possible costs. It’s important to keep in mind that “potential” hints at what a company can accomplish with ideal conditions. But most companies do not meet these conditions in reality. Also, be realistic about peak performance. For example, a manufacturing plant simply can not run at 100% capacity. There is down time for things like maintenance.

A great way to start realizing profit potential is to look at your pricing. Click here to learn how price effectively with our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

Steps to Realizing Profit Potential

What are the steps to realizing profit potential? While I could probably write hundreds of different ways to realize a company’s profit potential, I have compiled a few steps that every small to medium size company can focus on first.

Focus on Throughput

Throughput is “is the number of units of output a company produces and sells over a period of time.” Remember, only units both produced and sold during the time period count. Profit potential lies between producing X number of products while simultaneously reducing operating and inventory expenses.

Do not forget to take into consideration your Total Units produced must consider down time for routine maintenance.

To calculate throughput, use the following formulas:

Throughput = Productive Capacity x Productive Processing Time x Process Yield 

Throughput =   Total Units    x  Processing Time  x  Good Units 
             Processing Time       Total Time        Total Units 

Analyze SG&A

Another step to realizing profit potential includes analyzing your company’s SG&A expenses. SG&A stands for Selling, General, and Administrative expenses. It is also known as overhead. When a company analyzes SG&A, they will realize this is the easiest place to looking for unrealized profit potential. Does your company have a large number of non-sales personnel? Are those employees needed to operate? If not, then merge responsibilities for those employees into the roles of essential personnel. Do you carry a lot of expenses that if cut would not disrupt either the manufacturing or sales processes? If so, then analyze whether those expenses are necessary or required.  Do you have sales people that are compensated with a base salary when it should be commission based?  How did you build your budget for SG&A this year? Did you just take last years budget and add 5%, or did you really analyze SG&A?

If you have cut all the SG&A possible and are still not profitable, then take a look at your pricing with our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

Realizing Profit Potential

Know What Is Valued

Companies are giving away more value per dollar of revenue than ever before. That’s what marketing teams are being taught to do. However, many companies are giving value away without being able to actually afford it. Look at your minimum viable product. Is all the extra bells and whistles you are adding to your product and service actually adding value to your bottom line? Ask yourself whether customers would leave if you cut those extra “value-adders”. If you determine that they would not leave, then streamline your product and/or service.

Of course, I am not saying to decrease the quality or tear away value that is actually valued. However, companies should know what the company values. Then, they should focus on that. For example, Tesla offers an incredible experience with its technology. It’s no doubt that they have found value in their vehicle. But what if Tesla started including a fuzzy steering wheel cover? Their customers would probably think that the fuzzy cover is tacky and does not add much value. They want to feel the leather under their finger tips. Therefore, Tesla should stop spending money purchasing the unwanted fuzzy steering wheel covers for their customers.

Address Your Culture

Another thing that may be impacting your profitability is your company’s culture. When you address your culture, look at productivity, efficiency, accuracy, moral and the people.

For example, a sales driven firm knows they could be more profitable. They have reduced their costs and priced their products for profitability. However, there is still something missing. The financial leader walks through the sales department, factory floor, and ends up in the customer service department. There are no smiles, yelling, and phones slamming. Unfortunately, no matter how hard sales and operations worked, customer service representatives were loosing more customers than normal. The financial leader discovered that their culture was all about making the sale and delivering it. They did not value servicing customers or continuing to build a relationship with those customers.

In another example, a company noticed they were only focusing on the unprofitable or lower margin clients. The profitable customers did not have the same level of attention. Instead of loosing the unprofitable clients, they chose to pull back support and created a paid support program. If those needy customers wanted more support, then they were going to have to pay for it.

Analyze Pricing

Are you pricing for profitability? By now, you should have looked at your COGS and SG&A (or operating expenses). If you have already reduced those costs as much as possible, then determine if you are profitable or not. If you are still not profitable or as profitable as your shareholders want, then you need to make changes at the top – pricing. Access our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide to learn how to price profitably.

Realizing Profit Potential

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Realizing Profit Potential

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Maximizing Your Bottom Line In 3 Simple Steps

Sales are great, but wouldn’t they be better if you were actually able to reap the rewards? Many CEOs that were not trained with an accounting/finance background struggle to understand profitability. They think that if sales are great, then the business is great. But when sales increase, inventory and overhead increases. Productivity also decreases – due to exhaustion or overwork. Collections lapse because there isn’t a “pressure” to collect. And unfortunately, that is when companies suffer the most. Sales start to decline, but they don’t change their habits. In this Wiki, you will learn how everything below sales on your income statement is critical to your company’s success and how you should be maximizing your bottom line – net income – at any stage of your company’s life cycle. Let’s look at how maximizing your bottom line in 3 simple steps can happen.

What is the Bottom Line?

First, what is the bottom line we are referring to? It is the net income on your income statement or P&L statement. This is what you have left after all the costs of goods sold, administrative expenses, and overhead have been subtracted from revenue. We look at this number carefully because that is how much you are able to put into retained earnings or reinvest back into your company. In addition, the amount can be used to issue dividends to their shareholders. Maximizing your bottom line should be an integral part of your company’s processes.

Profitability starts at the top of the income statement. If your prices are not set to create profitable environment, then you will be not able to maximize the bottom line. Learn how to price for profit using our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

Maximizing Your Bottom Line In 4 Simple Steps

There a are several ways to maximize your bottom line – some more extensive and time consuming than other. But there are 3 areas to focus on to maximize your bottom line – including productivity, overhead, and collections.

1. Productivity is Key

It’s been a common theme among business blogs and news sources (Entrepreneur, Forbes, WSJ, etc.) to improve productivity. Why? Because productivity is key in maximizing your bottom line. But what really happens when you improve productivity? You have more supply, decrease the cost to produce 1 unit, and increase sales. It speeds up your operations so that you can fulfill more orders for quickly.

2. Manage Overhead

Great revenues have very little meaning if your overhead costs are not properly managed. Look deeper into your overhead expenses and find out if there are any costs you can reduce or completely remove. The problem is often more complex than large expense accounts on the P&L. You must interact with various departments to think critically and solve problems. Ensure that every single overhead cost is necessary to provide the desired service levels. Maximum controllability over costs leads to higher profits for the company to reap.

3. Collect Quicker

Collections are an important part of business. If a company sells $10,000 worth of product but only collects $3,000, then their cash is tied up in inventory, etc. As a result, they experience a cash crunch. We have worked with clients who were in the same situation and they neglected to ever collect the outstanding balance. Their bottom line suffered, but they didn’t think to look at their collections process. There are two metrics that you can look at to monitor collections and use to collect quicker.

The first metric is DSO. Do you know your Days Sales Outstanding (DSO)? This is a great measurement to know where you are currently and how by making slight adjustments, you can increase profitability. Use the following formula to calculate DSO.

 DSO = (Accounts Receivable / Total Credit Sales) * 365

The second metric to look at is Collections Effectiveness Index (CEI). This is a slightly more accurate representation of the time it takes to collect receivables than DSO. Because CEI can be calculated more frequently than DSO, it can be a key performance indicator (KPI) that you track in your company. If the CEI percentage decreases one month, then leadership are alerted that something is going on. The goal here is to be at 100%.

CEI = [(Beginning Receivables + Monthly Credit Sales – Ending Total Receivables) ÷ (Beginning Receivables + Monthly Credit Sales – Ending Current Receivables)] * 100

Another method to collect quicker is to tie receivables to the sales person’s commission. This will not only encourage your sales team to be part of the collections process, but it will help keep your company cash positive.

Effective Strategies for Improving Profitability

While we’ve been focused on maximizing your bottom line as your current financials stand, we also wanted to share some effective strategies for improving profitability.

Price for Profit

Are your prices leading to a satisfying net income?  If not, then these are some questions you can inquire:

  • Are additional costs being reflected on the price?
  • Are you using Margin vs Markup interchangeably?
  • Is your overhead being covered?

The solution might be simple: Adjust your price!

Learn how to price for profit using our Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide. This whitepaper will help you identify if you have a pricing problems and how to fix it.

Create Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

Also, create Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). SOPs are step by step instructions written by a company to assist employees in completing routine procedures. They are necessary in a company to ensure operations run smoothly. The better your company’s SOPs are, the more efficient it will run. Create operating procedures that are simple, easy to read, and most importantly make them lead to a purpose.

Focus on Profitable Customers

Identifying profitable customers is instrumental to a company’s success. Once you completely identify your most profitable group of customers, focus your attention on them. Use your marketing funds primarily on you most profitable customers. A customer outside of that target market is still a viable customer, but they just shouldn’t receive as much marketing attention since they are not their primary and most profitable customer segment.

When maximizing your bottom line, start with your prices and pricing process. Access the free Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide to learn how to price profitably.

maximizing your bottom line

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