Tag Archives | market value

Asset Market Value vs Asset Book Value

See Also:
Accounting Income vs Economic Income
Economic Value Added
Value Drivers:Building Reliable Systems to Sustain Growth
Basis Definition
Variance Analysis
Goodwill Impairment

Asset Market Value versus Asset Book Value

Book value and market value are two ways to value an asset. An asset’s book value can differ from its market value. Market value is the value of an asset as currently priced in the marketplace. In comparison, book value refers to the value of an asset as reported on the company’s balance sheet; however, some assets are reported at market value on the balance sheet.

Book value is equal to the asset’s historical purchase price minus accumulated depreciation. Since book value is based on the asset’s actual purchase price, consider it more reliable but less relevant than market value.

Market value, also called fair market value, is equal to the asset’s current price or value in the open marketplace. Since market value is based on current market prices, consider it more relevant but less reliable than book value.

Asset Value for Company Valuations

Are you comparing asset valuation methods for the purpose of valuing your company? This can become complex, especially when comparing methods for valuing assets. When a valuation becomes complex, it is standard practice to consult with a valuation firm. Need help finding one? We will connect you with one of our strategic partners for your valuation needs. Fill out the form below to get connected:

Your will receive your information between 9-5 Monday through Friday. You can expect to hear back within 24 hours. We only use your information to contact you for the desired help.

If you don’t want to leave any value on the table, then download the Top 10 Destroyers of Value whitepaper.

asset market value

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Exit Strategy Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. This tool enables you to maximize potential value before you exit.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

Logistics Chain

Share this:
0

Agency Costs

See Also:
Are You Collecting the Data You Need to Run Your Business?
Average Cost
Sunk Costs
Restructuring Expense
Joint Costs
Commercial Agents

Agency Costs Definition

The agency costs definition is the internal costs incurred from asymmetric information or conflicts of interest between principals and agents in an organization.

In a corporation, the principals would be the shareholders and the agents would be the managers. The shareholders want the managers to run the company in a way that maximizes shareholder value. Conversely, the managers may want to run the company in a way that maximizes the managers’ own personal power or wealth, even if it lowers the market value of the company. These divergent interests can result in agency costs. There are three common types of agency costs: monitoring, bonding, and residual loss.

(NOTE: Want the Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide? It walks you through a step-by-step guide to maximizing your profits on each side. Get it here!)

Types of Agency Costs

When the principals attempt to monitor or restrict the actions of agents, they incur. Learn about the types of agency costs below:

Monitoring Costs

For example, the board of directors at a company acts on behalf of shareholders to monitor and restrict the activities of management. This is to ensure that behavior maximizes shareholder value. The cost of having a board of directors is therefore, at least to some extent, considered an agency monitoring cost. Costs associated with issuing financial statements and employee stock options are also monitoring costs.

Bonding Costs

Furthermore, an agent may commit to contractual obligations that limit or restrict the agent’s activity. For example, a manager may agree to stay with a company even if the company is acquired. The manager must forego other potential employment opportunities. Consider that implicit cost an agency bonding cost.

Residual Losses

Residual losses are the costs incurred from divergent principal and agent interests despite the use of monitoring and bonding.

Calculate agency costs when setting prices and start pricing for profit. If you want to price for profit, then download the free Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide.

Agency Costs Definition, Types of Agency Costs, Agency Costs

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Strategic Pricing Model Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan to set your prices to maximize profits.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

Agency Costs Definition, Types of Agency Costs, Agency Costs

Share this:
3

LEARN THE ART OF THE CFO