Tag Archives | employee turnover

Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

Hire For Traits, Not For TalentYou have probably heard the term, hire for traits, not for talent.

I can tell you ever since I first heard of this term, I have gone back in time and the different experiences I have had, that related to this term over the last 28 years of my career.  I am convinced more than ever that we should all apply this to ever hire we make.

Hire for traits, not for talent.

Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

You would be surprised, or maybe not, how many times I have worked with accounting, finance, or operational professionals that really knew their stuff.

Technically, they were all there and then some.

But when it came with dealing with these individuals on a personal level, they were very difficult to deal with or even impossible to deal with.


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Case Studies

In my 28+ years of experience, I have had numerous good and bad experiences hiring. Let’s look at a few of them!

“Super Star” Divisional Controller That Knew It All

I worked for a large publicly traded company, and the operating world was divided into regions for the entire world. So, there were several divisional controllers.

Well… There was this “super star” divisional controller that knew it all. He was technically the smartest guy in the room when it came to the latest accounting pronouncements. But when it came to dealing with people, this mad man was impossible to deal with. He was rude, had temper tantrums, and was just a jerk. He got the job because on paper he was a super star. But when it came to working with others, it was impossible.

As a result, he had a short career at the company.

Cancer In the Organization

I also dealt with an operating guy recently who was hired for his technical expertise in a specific operation. He was very talented when it came to the operation of the business. But once again, he was insubordinate, treated others like dirt, and just a cancer in the organization.

Sponge in Learning

On the contrary, I recently hired a young man with very little work experience, smart, and was a sponge in learning about the business or how we did things. This young man has turned out to be a real super star. I did not hire him for his talents, but his traits and ability to work well with others.

Conclusion: Hiring for Traits

The stories above are real and I have another dozen like these.  All of these individuals had “talent” in there area of expertise, but their personal traits varied. Those that failed had horrible personal traits. Those individuals that I have worked with that had excellent personal traits turned out to be excellent employees. An individual with exceptional personal traits can learn anything.

Personally, I would want to always hire that person that has exceptional personal traits, and maybe average on talent.

Why?

Because I know I can train this person and make him or her a super star.

Think about those individuals that you have worked with in your career. Think of their traits versus talent. Someone can have exceptional talent, but if they can not get along with others, work in a team environment or have other horrible traits, then that person will always fail.

Don’t make the same mistakes when hiring your next employee. Learn about our 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team and how hiring for traits is the way to go!

Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

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Hire For Traits, Not For Talent

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Cost of Turnover

See also:
Hire For Traits, Not For Talent
Corporate Zombies: Combat the Rise of Unengaged Employees
Millennials: The Hippies of the 21st Century
Turnover in Collections is Destroying Your DSO

Cost of Turnover

If you take a look at any company’s income statement, you will notice that one of the largest expense items is salaries or compensation. While companies require employees to conduct business, it is expensive to have them. What happens when those employees leave? Many times, companies do not calculate the cost of turnover and how it impacts the bottom line.


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What is the Cost of Turnover?

The cost of turnover is the cost associated with turning over one position. This calculation includes the cost of hiring for that position, training the new employee, any severance or bonus packages, and managing the role when it is not filled.  Every company will experience some turnover. When a company has high employee turnover, they risk impacting the profitability of their organization, the culture, and the productivity.

Every organization should strive to retain their employees for as long as possible. If they see a uptick in employee turnover, then they should take action to reduce turnover and improve retention. This results in more efficient operations and higher profits.

How Turnover Impacts Profitability

Previously, we mentioned that turnover impacts profitability. There are various ways employee turnover impacts the profitability of a company, including employees picking up duties (overtime pay, injury, exhaustion, decrease productivity), the cost of hiring a new employee, and the overall state of the company’s culture. For example, a company that has a heavy presence on the web looses its marketing director. The current employees will have to figure out what that position actually did, pick up extra responsibilities, work overtimes, etc. If it was a planned departure (more than two weeks), then the transition may be more smooth; however, if it was an unexpected departure, then the company will be in a bind.

Now, it’s time to fill that vacant role. That takes time – especially, if you are slow to hire and quick to fire. In addition, the current hiring process is not cheap either. No matter where that employee lies on the income statement – in COGS or SG&A – employee turnover has a huge impact to the bottom line. Either, you experience a sales person that is not selling (decreased revenue and increased costs) or a support person that is just increasing costs.

Calculate the Cost of Turnover

So, how do you calculate the cost of turnover? First, know the primary costs that are associated to turnover 1 position. Those include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cost of hiring
  • Cost of training and/or onboarding
  • Any severance or bonus packages upon departure
  • Loss in productivity during vacancy
  • Errors in customer service
  • Loss of engagement from other employees

Use the following formula to calculate the cost of turnover:

Cost of Turnover = (Cost of Hiring + Cost of Onboarding and Training + Severance + Loss in Productivity) * Number of Employees Lost

Focus On Employee Retention

Turnover impacts profitability, so it is important that you focus on employee retention. There are several reasons to focus on employee retention, including consistency, the bottom line, culture, and reputation.

Learn how to be a financial leader who increases employee retention in their organization with our execution plans, whitepapers, webinars, office hours, and so much more in the SCFO Lab.

Consistency

Consistency is key in any company. If your company is experiencing turnover in a client facing role, then turnover will cause more problems than profitability. For example, a consulting agency has 5 project managers in a year. The clients do not know who is there project manager or if anything is getting dropped or who to contact. It’s simply frustrating. In another example, a company looses all of its experienced team members within a few months. Now, they have new employees that are not familiar with the process, systems, team, or company. It will be hard for that company to gain any momentum without a consistent staff or a staff dominated by rookies.

Bottom Line 

On average, every time an employee leaves, it takes 6-9 months of salary to find a replacement. For example, if a person leaves and made $40,000, that’s anywhere between $20-30,000 of hiring and onboarding costs that were not previously anticipated. If you lose a higher level employee, then expect to pay more. The cost of turnover makes a dent in the bottom line.

Culture

How can you establish a company culture when your workforce is constantly changing? Establishing a good culture is difficult to do, but establishing a culture when there is no consistent workforce is near to impossible. We have seen how culture impacts the financial results of the company.

Reputation 

Beyond company culture, high employee turnover impacts the company’s reputation. Job seekers research the companies when applying to a position. If you cannot retain employees, then what does that say about your company? Your brand and reputation will be impacted by turnover. Unfortunately for the company, there are online resources such as Glassdoor that give employees and ex-employees a platform to give honest feedback about the company.


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Employee Retention Definition

The employee retention definition is the company’s ability to retain its current employees. If a company has a 95% retention rate, it means that the organization retained 95% of its employees for the given period. Every company should strive to improve their employee retention rate as it influences the culture and impacts the company’s profits.

Effective Employee Retention Strategies

The following includes effective employee retention strategies.

Establish Clear Goals and Expectations

First, establish clear goals and expectations. Employees become frustrated when they are unsure as to what their duties and expectations are. Communicate clearly with your team what your expectations are and what their responsibilities are. In addition, make goals together as a team. They will be more attainable, and everyone will be on the same page.

Offer Competitive Benefits

Among many reasons, studies rate salary as a top reason why employees leave a company. If your company is not able to exceed competitive benefits, then at least offer comparable benefits. Remember, salary is not the only reason why employees leave.

Culture

Culture is proven to impact the financial results of an organization. Establish a company culture that makes it enjoyable for your employees to work there. Some companies like Zappos are extremely customer centric. Other companies may offer flexible working environments (remote work, flex desks, etc.). Moreover, create a culture of open communication. The #1 reason why someone leaves a company is not because of salary, but it’s because of the manager. If there is an issue, fix it the first time you hear about it.

Value Employees 

Above all else, make your employees feel valued. If an employee works 40 hours a week, then you (the company) take approximately 24% of their time up by work alone. And if that employee sleeps an average of 8 hours a night, then about 57% of their week is either working or sleeping. Then the remaining 43% is spent eating, running errands, and spending time with family and friends. With such a significant amount of time at the office, reassure them that their work is valuable. Show them how they are contributing to the bottom line.

Start addressing turnover by recruiting a star quality team that is right for your organization. Determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, and click here to access our  5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Cost of Turnover

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Cost of Turnover

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Mistakes Manufacturing Companies Make

Mistakes Manufacturing Companies Make

Job costing, cost accounting, manufacturing costs, what does all of this mean? Oftentimes, job costing, cost accounting, and manufacturing costs are used interchangeably. As a manufacturer, it does not matter what you call it. But it is critical that as a manufacturer, you capture all of your conversion costs. Simply put, you are taking raw material and converting it to a finished good that is ready for sale. You need to capture 100% of those cost of converting the raw material. Most small companies start with the most basic bookkeeping, and that’s okay. But there are two huge mistakes manufacturing companies make that you need to avoid.

 

Eventually, you need to have proper accounting transactions and systems to capture all of those manufacturing costs to have accurate margins. Accurate financial statements and margins will allow you to correctly price your product and will allow you to make adjustments to your business. This is helpful when you have a change in prices of materials or labor, or if your volume throughput changes for whatever reason.

Mistakes Manufacturing Companies Make

In my career, I have seen two recurring mistakes manufacturing companies make that are related to accounting process, procedures and systems.

First, a company may not want to spend the time and money to improve their cost accounting and systems. As a result, this company will struggle forever. The managers of that business will not have accurate financial reports, and they will likely feel the pain when markets turn or are in a high growth situation. Remember, cash gets tight when in either a growth or decline pattern, especially if it’s not managed well.

Second, a company wants to improve the manufacturing cost accounting, but they overdo it. They want a report that tracks every penny and part, and they install a massive expensive system. Many times, they install the wrong system for their company because it was marketed as the best accounting system. This happens when companies do not spend the money to go through a system selection process. They all end up spending much more than the cost of the professional system selection and bust their budget.

Best Practices for Manufacturing Companies

As a manufacturing company, please consider the following as a best practices for your leadership to abide by.

Analysis Paralysis

You DO have to capture 100% of your costs to take raw material and manufacture a finished good. However, this does not mean you need a separate dashboard or KPI for every cost item. If it is not material and the outcome of the cost is not going to change your mind or cause you to make a business decision, then you may reconsider trying to measure it. Remember, everything you want to measure has a cost itself of measuring it. Not capturing 100% of the costs can be devastating to your company.  Remember the quote from Benjamin Franklin, “A small leak will sink a great ship.

Many business owners and financial leaders want to measure everything. But you should limit your key  performance indicators to those that will lead to business decisions! Click here to access our KPI Discovery Cheatsheet to identify those indicators that really drive value.

Margins

When you manufacture a product, you have your obvious direct materials and direct labor – measuring Cost of Goods Sold. This is absolutely crucial in a manufacturing company. But there are other costs that you need to measure. I am referring to your indirect expenses, especially your sales, general and administrative expenses. You also want to measure your gross margin and/or contribution margin and your Earnings, Before, Interest, Tax, Depreciation and Amortization (EBITDA). Consider the implementation of analyzing trends based on a trailing twelve months (“TTM”). This will help you spot trends in your business and financially lead your company. Do not forget your balance sheet. Everything ultimately affects cash and working capital.  Without cash and working capital, you will create a financial disaster. Do have KPIs for your balance sheet items that you want to measure.

Systems

Systems are an important part of having a productive and efficient accounting department. It seems that every year there is a new operating system that comes in to the market, and it seems that the developers of these systems want to expand into every market – beyond manufacturing and accounting. With all of these choices and with all of the talented sales people, you need to understand what the choices are for your business. It is worth spending the money to go through a system selection process.

Timing

Timing is everything in manufacturing. Consider the following timing of:

  • Throughput
  • Delivery of the finished good
  • When you modify your standard costs
  • How quickly you close you books and generate financial records that are accurate and serve as a tool to help you run your business
  • Collections so you have cash to place that next order of raw material

Employee Turnover

I recently quoted in a past blog that employee turnover in the U.S. has an average cost of $65,000 per year per employee lost. The number in a manufacturing environment is actually higher because there are often specialty skills that need to be acquired in manufacturing. So keeping a close watch on employee turnover is crucial in a manufacturing company.

Inventory

For whatever reason, inventory seems to be the “Achilles Heal” in many manufacturing companies. Companies either do not properly manage inventory, they have bad practices, or it just seems that it is never right. Once you establish a good process and reconcile inventory, it should be more of a maintenance routine if your people know that they are doing.  Consider the following for inventory:

Be Realistic About Inventory

Be realistic about what is obsolete inventory and good inventory. I know that companies, especially public companies hate to write off inventory.  But you are just kicking the can down the road by not dealing with it now.

Clean Up

Get rid of the junkyard! So many companies I have seen have a junkyard behind the manufacturing facility.  It has been there for years and all it does is accumulate rats, snakes and rust.  Liquidate it and get a scrap dealer to take it off of your hands. You can use that cash for door prizes at the next company party!

Stay Focused

Stick to your business and stay focused. Especially in closely held companies, some business owners waste money on the craziest things. I have saw hundreds of old mopeds (remember, these are bicycles with a weed eater motor) in the back of a large industrial manufacturer. The owner got a “great deal” on them, so he purchased them to resell. The problem is that the initial transaction happened 7 years ago. I also saw a massive specialty machine that cuts steel in the back of a pipe manufacturer because the owner thought he could open a new line of business cutting huge pieces of steel. This machine was two stories tall and weighed thousands of tons. Still to this day, I have no idea how they ever moved it. In addition, the owner never got the new line of business started because there is not a building big enough on his property. The machine has not run in 10 years.

Physical Count

Establish strict physical counts quarterly or at least annually. Have the right team of people conduct the physical count.

Adjustments

Make adjustments to your inventory, and get it over with. Write it up or down in your accounting records.

Segregate Inventory

Segregate your inventory. There is something beautiful about walking into a manufacturing facility and seeing exactly where the raw material, work in process, and finished goods are. Keep obsolete inventory in a separate area that is clearly marked off. Tag and count everything!

Hire a Good Cost Accountant

Cost accounting is a specialty area within the accounting profession. Unfortunately, not every accountant or controller knows cost accounting. Yes, hopefully most accredited accounting programs at universities cover cost accounting, but that does not mean the person you are hiring is a cost accountant. Someone with good manufacturing experience and understands cost accounting is worth his weight in gold. This person will add value to your bottom line.

In the meantime, start measuring and tracking your KPIs. Download our free KPI Discovery Cheatsheet and start tracking your KPIs today!

Mistakes Manufacturing Companies Make
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Mistakes Manufacturing Companies Make

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How HR Impacts Your Business

HR Impacts Your Business

Not too long ago, the Human Resource (“HR”) function was a clerical position that focused on helping the management team set appointments to interview prospect employees looking for work. Or they kept track of hours worked for a company. But those days are gone. HR impacts your business in ways that it once had no influence over. In fact, the HR role has evolved to include advancements in management, technology, and legal issues.

How HR Impacts Your Business

After having served as CEO and CFO for a couple different companies, I learned first hand that those two executive roles are really about managing people. Sure, we have our budgets, board meetings, bankers and analysts to deal with day-in and day-out. But what took up a significant part of my time in different companies was managing people.

Part of a wingman’s responsibility is to know what impacts your business. The CEO needs to know how every area, like HR, impacts your business. Click here to learn how to be the trusted advisor your CEO needs with our How to be a Wingman guide.

Science of Managing People

There are two sciences involved in managing people:

Psychology = the science of mind and behavior; the mental or behavioral characteristics of an individual or group

Sociology = the science of society, social institutions, and social relationships; specifically: the systematic study of the development, structure, interaction, and collective behavior of organized groups of human beings

We are clearly dealing with people in our management roles. As if that was not complicated enough, then add the legal system to that. This includes complex laws like the Affordable Health Care Act (“Obama Care”). Also consider things like American Disability Act (“ADA”), HIPPA, U.S. DOL,  Medicare, EEOC… And if you have a 401K or a pension plan, then you are regulated by a host of other laws and regulations.

Get the feeling yet? This is not a simple environment that can be administered by just an admin. The science of managing people requires a HR professional.

Today’s HR Function

Today, the HR function is a significant area of your business that needs a professional looking over it whether you outsource the HR function or if you are big enough to hire someone in house. Do not minimize this role in your business. HR professionals today have a variety of certifications and credentials and a good understanding of labor laws.

HR Impacts Your BusinessHow the HR Professional Works With Management 

Whether you are a small company of 20 employees or of 2,000 employees, your HR professional should be close to the executive team. In a typical company, this position may report to the CFO or even the CEO.  Executives: keep your HR professional close to you. Have at least a weekly standing meeting to discuss HR issues with that person. Have your HR partner develop and keep dashboards with key information that you want to see relate to your labor force. With the complexity of the HR regulations and labor laws, we need a cooler prevailing head to be at our side as management.

The larger your organization is and the more employees you have, this is ever more important. In addition, larger organization have more moving parts, and that includes HR. As an executive, having your pulse on the moral and culture of your organization is critical.

Have a pulse on the company and advise your CEO in their strategy and decision making. Click here to learn how to be the trusted advisor your CEO needs with our How to be a Wingman guide.

Managing Employee Turnover

In good times, we are building, hiring, growing, and asking more of your employees. You need to have your employees following you as the leader. In bad times, there is uncertainty, You are letting people go. You may also be asking more of  your employees. But you need to find the balance between not promising to much and asking employees to deliver. That is where a solid HR person will be worth their weight in gold. If you are a stable company that isn’t growing or shrinking, then you want to keep a stable workforce.

I recently saw a statistic that the cost in the U.S. of employee turnover is on average $65,000 per employee. Think about the loss of an employee and what it involves… Disrupted departments, time and cost of recruiting/training, learning curve for the new person. It really adds up. I have seen clients with high turnover, and they are simply bleeding cash. What is odd, is that I can’t believe that there are executives that simply live with the high turnover and do not address the issue.

Growing companies really need to keep HR at the top of the list. To be a successful growing company, you need to offer competitive benefits, develop policies, employee files and have a steady pipeline of additional resources when needed. There needs to be a lot of training so that employees follow company policies and labor laws. Believe it or not, State and Federal labor laws change frequently. As a result, your operations people must stay trained up to know what to do or not to do.

Quick Case Study

I was in a situation with close to 1,500 employees. The company entered into a financially distressed situation. We had to lay off half of the workforce while keeping the moral up for those staying behind. We restructured the operations of the business and shut down a whole division. Without a strong HR team, I am not sure we could have pulled it off. A reduction in force of that size involves special notices to cities, counties, and states. It involves severance benefits, angry people, sad people, and transitions of workload.

You can’t afford not to have an HR professional at your side, especially during drastic workforce changes.

The cost of violating the laws, regulations, or getting involved in a lawsuit around HR matters can be devastating to a company.  Not only is there a financial cost, but there is a branding and reputation cost as well. I once saw a large multinational company cancel a contract with a smaller supplier of supplies because the smaller supplier had pretty serious HR violations and was involved in litigation. The benefit of having the right HR partner at your side will far outweigh the cost. Your HR professional or financial leadership should be the wingman to the CFO. It’s time to step up into this trusted advisor role! Access our How to be a Wingman guide here.

HR Impacts Your Business

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HR Impacts Your Business

1

Hiring Expectations for Recent Graduates

employer's expectation

It’s the first week of May which means that caps will soon be flying in the air and college graduates will be entering the workforce.  What these new workers may not know is that employers often have an unspoken expectation that graduates arrive job-ready on day one…

Sounds pretty reasonable, right?

But with advances in technology, many “entry-level” positions of the past have been automated.  The result – fewer opportunities for new graduates to get in on the ground floor of an operation and learn the ropes. Instead, today’s graduates are expected to hit the ground solving problems rather than spending time getting their feet wet.

Oftentimes, graduates make academic decisions in order to increase their chances of securing the perfect job. With $1.3 trillion (and growing) in student debt, graduates are faced with the decision of whether or not to incur more debt to comply with increased expectations of employers.

What should be the employer’s expectations of those newly graduated job candidates?

Hiring Expectations for Recent Graduates

Accenture, a consulting firm, provided research and insights on college graduate expectations of employment in 2015. The results show that employers’ expectations and young people’s assumptions are not line.

College Graduates & Young Adult’s Expectations

An average 69% of college graduates believe that they need more post-graduation education or training to land their dream job. This could include, but is not limited to, earning an MBA, getting further certifications, etc. In addition, 77% of college graduates expect their future employers to provide additional training.

(Are you hiring new college graduates? Download our exclusive 5 guiding principles for building a star-quality team here.)

If you or someone you know is a recent college graduate, it’s imperative that you prepare based upon the employer’s expectations. While roughly 57% of employers provide on-the-job training, graduates should prepare for transitioning into the workforce as well as acclimating to the high standards expected.

(Know someone graduating this May? Pass this tip sheet along to them!)

Employer’s Expectations

Almost half (43%) of employers do not provide on-the-job training. Instead, these employers expect for these graduates to know everything. I suppose it makes sense to expect a 22-year-old who has invested $100,000 (give or take) into their college education to have the knowledge, capabilities, and resources to succeed in a position without any training, right?

My involvement with the Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship as a lecturer has taught me that graduates need training. Some of the students I work with have had numerous internships at prestigious organizations, but they still require on-the-job training (it could even look like a mentorship). But no organization is the same. Each potential employee that you hire has to learn the systems, the culture, and more importantly, how to be successful within your organization.

There are two things that employers can look at: skills and talents.

Skill [skil]: the ability to do something well; expertise

Talent [tal-uh nt]: natural aptitude or skill

I can teach skills, but I can’t teach talent.

Here are a few expectations I have of all employees (including new grads):

There are appropriate expectations for any job, but it’s important to analyze the expectations that you have and the consequences they may create. An employer should focus on how to discover the natural talents that a job candidate has than to teach skills and further develop their talents.

Employee Turnover

Employee turnover accounts for the cost of acquiring, maintaining, and firing/resigning an employee. There are also costs in every stage in sustaining an employee within your organization. This includes employees that quit, are let go or retire.

Considering employee’s compensation,  your investment in your human capital, training, hiring, benefits, and so much more, it’s no wonder that the #2 reason why businesses fail is because of employee turnover!

While there is no perfect equation to calculate an organization’s employee turnover,  it can roughly be calculated as the number of employees who have left divided by the total number of employees in that segment (# left in time period/# total employees in segment.) For example, if Company A lost one of its fifteen employees in one year, then its annual turnover would be 6.67% or 1/15.

No matter how you calculate employee turnover, it’s important to keep your expectations of your employees (including your new grad hires) reasonable. If you’re not careful about how to care for your team, then your employee turnover ratio will go through the roof.

Hiring a Star Quality Team

There are many factors that go into running a successful company. Hiring a star quality team is essential to grow your company. For most organizations, people are at the root of the company’s success. Whether you own a mom & pop restaurant, manage a local hardware store, or own an oil & gas equipment manufacturing company, your team is vital to your success.

employer's expectationEven though the price of oil is slowly climbing up after it’s long economic downturn, fewer professional jobs are available during this time; however, the demand for talented candidates remains high. This becomes a cyclical issue that you as the financial leader, CEO or decision maker will have to continually face.

Unfortunately, universities fail to efficiently train students to transition their school-based skills and talents to the workforce. Until universities transition students into employees, hire based on the potential for the employee to grow.

(Are you trying to build a star-quality team? Download our free, exclusive 5 guiding principles for building a star-quality team here.)

Hiring Expectations for Recent Graduates, employer's expectations

Hiring Expectations for Recent Graduates, employer's expectations

Accenture 2015 College Graduate Employment Research

 

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Demand for Talented People: Addressing Employee Turnover

Working with clients over the years, it seems as though we’ve seen every employment trend come then go. Then they come back around again.  When the economy is bad, talented employees will stay in a less-than-desirable situation. Conversely, companies begin to tighten their belts and reduce headcount.  When the economy improves, these folks start looking for greener pastures and the demand for talented people increases. Especially as unemployment levels fall and economic forecasts become more optimistic, many of our clients are finding themselves in this situation.

The Demand for Talented People

A recent Robert Half & Associates report, The Demand for Skilled Talent, discusses what’s driving this demand for talented people.  Following are some of the contributing factors highlighted in the report…

Shortage of Candidates

An 18% increase in job openings from April 2013 to April 2014 has given talented people more opportunities to find the right fit.  Even better news for college-educated employees, job growth for degreed positions is projected to be significantly better than for non-degreed positions.  With the growth in positions requiring a college degree, it’s likely to become even more difficult for companies to fill highly-skilled positions.

Employee Confidence is Building

Voluntary separations are on the rise, up 19% over the last two years. This underscores the fact that employees are more willing to make a move.  With the increase in the demand for college-educated employees also comes higher salaries.  Average starting salaries for professionals are projected to rise 3.7% in 2014.  The promise of a bigger paycheck is motivating many talented professionals to explore their options.

Workers Are More Willing to Quit Their Jobs

As economic conditions improve, employees are more willing to take a risk on new opportunities.  The following chart from the report illustrates the growing number of workers who willingly left their jobs over the past two years.

 

Demand for talented people

 

Retaining Talent

Studies show that it can cost anywhere from 1-5 times the departing worker’s salary to find, hire and train their replacement.  This isn’t even considering the stress on an organization caused by the departure of key employees and the search for and assimilation of their successor. Given the current employment environment and the high cost and stress of replacing departed workers, it’s more important than ever to retain talented employees.

The Right Fit

One way to hang on to key people is to make sure they are the right fit when they are hired.  Too often, companies fill a position out of haste and fail to consider what the right person really looks like.  Click here for an article about hiring a star-quality team.

Temporary Employees

A trend that is becoming more prevalent in today’s companies is the use of temporary and contract labor.  This option is attractive to both employees and employers because both parties get an opportunity to “try before they buy”.  The risk of an employee being out of work when a contract ends is being mitigated. This reason for this is because of increased opportunities for contract assignments available to skilled individuals.

Offer Training or Coaching

Another approach to employee retention is to offer training and coaching for existing employees to help close the skill gap.  Today’s organizations are running leaner than in the past. So opportunities for mentorship within the company are often hard to come by.  Many employees possess the raw talent to be great team members. But they simply lack experience or soft skills that can get them to that next level.

Click here for the full text of the Robert Half & Associates report.

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Demand for talented people

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Demand for talented people

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Is Employee Turnover a Problem
Employee Turnover

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Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Is employee turnover a problem in all companies? All companies lose employees. It’s healthy for an organization to have a measurable turnover. Sometimes people don’t fit into a company’s culture. But other times, employees have emergencies or life changing experiences that separate them from the company.  However, it is not to say that a 0% turnover is automatically unhealthy. Some companies reach their optimal staffing level and go for months or years without any voluntary or involuntary turnover. In many situations, this is nearly impossible and would require more time and resources than is practical.

Is Employee Turnover a Problem?

Tracking employee turnover is an essential key point indicator for most businesses. However, it is difficult to measure the costs associated with employees leaving. Hiring a new employee and transitioning away from the previous person is very costly. Some argue that the money lost during training is the key problem. While others recognize that the precious time that upper management must devote to interviewing and paperwork is the largest cost of all.

Each company will vary, and it will vary even more between industries. There are places to research whether your turnover rate is typical in comparison to other companies in your industry. For example, a quick search engine search with your NAICS code and “employee turnover” could give enough information to compare. Find your NAICS code here.  If not, more formal methods exist, such as using the Risk Management Association’s Annual Statement Studies. There is often free access to the large RMA book at local universities and small business development centers. You use your NAICS code to look up the data compiled about the different sized companies in that industry.

Do you have any opinions about employee turnover? Leave a comment below. For more information on this topic, check out Employee Turnover.

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is employee turnover a problem

is employee turnover a problem

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