Tag Archives | culture

Budgeting: It’s About Achieving Success

budgeting

Ron Rael, author of 13 ½ Strategic Ways of Winning the Budgeting Wars, once said that, “To achieve success in anything, you need two ingredients: a target to aim for and a way to measure your progress towards it.” Budgeting is all about achieving success in business. When you improve the budget process, you are able to foster both empowerment and accountability. Eventually, it will lead to a better company.  Although initiating change in your budgeting process will be challenging, it will further demonstrate your financial leadership.

The Most Common Budgeting Problems

The reason why you may have not seen much success come from your budget is because of the following common budgeting problems. First, the goals that are established before the budget is created are either too easy to reach or are simply unachievable.

If you know your economics, then you can avoid potential unrealistic goals or assumptions. Click here to download the Know Your Economics Worksheet to shape your economics to result in profit.

Then the budget is built on faulty or unrealistic assumptions. If the assumptions are correct, then maybe not everyone agrees on the assumptions or principles. This disagreement of what to build the budget on results in a dysfunctional team.

After the budget is built, there is often little to no feedback from management about the budget. We have seen this time and time again in companies. Those not involved in the budgeting process simply don’t care about the budget. They think that because they are not the CFO or Controller, it’s not their job. But everyone in an organization should care about the budget.

Additionally, when the budget is completed (usually after weeks of non-stop focus), it is filed away. It is rarely taken out and use in the daily strategy of the company. There is a lack of follow up.

When leadership has to meet with shareholders, stakeholders, etc. regarding the budget, they realize that they haven’t used the budget at all. Then they go to any means to achieve their budget. This manipulation defeats the purpose of having a budget. We suggest to design a budget that cannot be manipulated.

If you are thinking that the most common budgeting problems are more like cultural issues, then you’re correct!

Top 2 Budgeting Problems

Everything we have already said concerns the entire company. But the majority of our audience consist of CFOs and Controllers. The two problems that impact CFOs, Controllers, and budget directors the most include hidden agendas executives may have, the lack of commitment from executives for having a budget, and executives seen budgets as the CFO’s job. The responsibility of the budget is not solely reliant on the accounting department or CFO.

How Businesses Can Prepare for Natural DisastersHow to Budget Successfully

Budgeting successfully requires you to transform how you think about budgeting overall.

Use It As Decision-Making Tool

If you want to budget successfully, then you need to use your budget as a tool for decision making. It is not some disconnected document that has little to do with the company’s actual business. Instead, it should be a living and breathing part of your decision making. Plus, it is more effective when you use it to make decisions. When people ignore it or play games with it, your budget becomes ineffective.

Additionally, understanding the need to improve the quality of decision making and making it happen are two different animals. What you get all depends on the leaders’ commitment and attitude.

Use It As Management Tool

Budgeting is a very important management tool for achieving lasting success. A budget should establish the discipline to set up a plan. But you must also adhere to the plan. Furthermore, this management tool always you to measure your progress, and ultimately, your success.

“Without a yardstick, there is no measurement.  And, without measurement, there is no control”
– Pravin Shah

Issues Are a Result of Culture

We said it earlier, and we’re saying it again because it’s that important. Most budgeting issues are a result of an organization’s culture. Issues that lead to a poor quality budget process mean that these problems  already exist within the organization ALL THE TIME!

Cost Associated

Everything has its cost! The budget is no exception. Budgets take work! They are not easy to implement nor are they easy to manage. Some of these costs include the following:

  • A culture that supports planning
  • Top management’s commitment
  • A reliable and timely reporting system
  • Agreement on principles and assumptions
  • Reliable business information
  • Structure and defined responsibilities

In addition, there are other costs associated with budgeting that could impact the bottom line. If employees are not conserving costs and making the most of opportunities, the bottom line will suffer. If leaders are not investing in their tangible and intangible assets equally while employing them to their fullest potential, the future bottom line will suffer.

Require Specificity

The budget and the plan it drives from is only effective when it leads to specific actionable and measurable activities and generate stakeholder value. Therefore, a budget must require specificity.

Assumptions Drive Everything

Also, your assumptions drive everything. Therefore, it is crucial that everyone be on the same page regarding assumptions in relation to decisions on what is important in your budget.

Governance of Budgeting Process

When your leadership team establishes governance in your organization, they are deciding how to best use all their resources to accomplish the purpose or mission.

Governance Principles

Use the following governance principles in your budgeting process. A reality based budget and planning system that enhances accountability is necessary for the good governance because it increases transparency. Furthermore, the key factor in a realistic and honest budget is people and their accountability. A well conceived and thoughtful budget improves the governance demanded by all stakeholders. In addition, the budget is a reflection of the importance that your executives place on governance and ethical conduct. Every game played with the budget is actually a breach of the organizations Code of Ethics.

CFO’s Role in Making the Bottom Line Commitment

 The CFO is essentially the CEO’s cheerleader! The CFO inspires higher level of performance.  The greatest challenge is to ensure that the strategic objectives and operational plans are adequate and inspirational enough to achieve the leaders’ desired financial objectives. The leader’s three plans, when combined into a cohesive strategy, will generally lead to success; however you define it. Furthermore, the CFO and executive team are the guardians of all assets – physical, financial and human ones. Use these assets to implement the plan and achieve the goals!

 CFO’s Discipline

Having the discipline to build a healthy budget, and having the budget instill discipline across your firm has many benefits. Not only will your budget properly serve as a management tool, but the benefits of discipline will filter over to other areas of your operation which will lead to efficiency and profitability. The next step in achieving success through your budgeting is knowing your financials or economics. If you want to shape your economics to result in profit, then click here to download the Know Your Economics Worksheet.

budgeting

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Projections Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan to get ahead of your cash flow.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs


budgeting

1

Corporate Zombies: Combat the Rise of Unengaged Employees

Recently, we have seen a new term emerging regarding the type of employees some companies have: corporate zombies. Why should you as a financial leader care about the type of employees your company has? It all lies in your income statement. One of the largest (if not the largest) expense item is your human capital. If some of your employees are corporate zombies, that cannot be good for the financial future of your company and we’ll explain below.

What are Corporate Zombies?

So what are corporate zombies? Let’s break it down by starting with the word zombie. Zombies are depicted by popular culture to be reanimated corpses with a focused hunger for flesh (namely brains). But you put these zombies in a corporate setting, you find that they are hyper-focused on reaching a title or level within the company. They are speedy and efficient. But like general zombies, corporate zombies neglect to look left or right for any other solution to a problem. They lack creativity and instead, corporate zombies have an unquenchable hunger for power and influence. These employees neglect to innovate, go out of their way to serve customers, or solve problems. And they are rising up…

corporate zombiesWhy are Corporate Zombies rising up?

Corporate zombies are rising up for three potential reasons. They are:

  1. Unengaged in their current work
  2. Laser-focused on reaching management level
  3. No interests outside of work because they spend all their time in the office

In addition, we are seeing that corporate zombies in recruiting are hiring the same type of person. This person is on the fast track to management, are unengaged with doing the job that they currently have, and are spending all their time at work. While it may seem good to have those that want to be promoted and will work for that promotion, you must address whether they are putting in the work for the job they were hired to do. The army of corporate zombies are rising up as those in charge of hiring are adding more and more of the same type of person into their company.

Is your company overwhelmed by corporate zombies? If so, it’s time to start revamping how your company hires. Click here to download our free 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team whitepaper.

Why are Corporate Zombies destroying companies?

The 2AM emails, rolling into the office late, staying late, accommodating everyone, and living for the gold stars. When you add all these factors up, you will see an unproductive, uncreative, and exhausted employee that are wasting your time and money. Not good. These employees are destroying your company before your eyes, and they need to be stopped.

Unengaged Employees

According to the most recent Gallup poll on employee engagement, 67% of employees in companies located in the United States are unengaged. Most of the time, you will not be able to walk into a company and see this. But after spending a little with employees in different departments, there will be a couple things that stick out to you. People are watching the clock, trying to prove how much work they are doing (and completely disregard the quality of the work completed), and are sucking up to their superiors. While they may be engaged with their position, they are not engaged with the work needing to be done.

In addition, these unengaged employees are looking to step up into a more superior management position. But another interesting thing to note is that not everyone should be a manager. Gallup also reports that “only 10% of human beings are naturally wired to be great managers — and some others, while not naturally gifted, are teachable. But companies choose candidates with the right talent for the job only 18% of the time.” By putting employees that may “work hard” but do not produce quality work into management roles, leaders will continue this cycle of building a zombie-like company.

Reduced Productivity

If you told an eight-year-old to clear the dinner table and put things in the dishwasher, you may find that although the task will get done but it may be done not correctly. Employees in your company do each task and move onto the next so quickly that there is no check of the work done. Down the line, those or other employees will have to redo those tasks – wasting the company’s money. Their hyper-focused attention on reaching the end goal skips over the full scope of a project.

Although millennials are most often blamed for this, all employees that leave late, stay up late, and are on the clock essentially 24/7 are destroying their own productivity. 24/7 work creates exhaustion, tension between the employer and employee, decreased productivity, and reduced loyalty. An employee starts out exhausted. They think that to get to the next level, they need to be on the clock always. Then if they don’t see progress on getting that promotion, they begin to resent the company. That resentment quickly morphs into decreased productivity. If more work doesn’t move the needle, then they start producing less work. Eventually, they leave the firm. Everyone knows this: employee turnover is a killer for companies.

Response Not Initiative

Have you noticed that your company is more responsive than proactive? After a customer, vendor, or employee brings up a complaint, your company then begins to find a solution. But there is no initiative to find a solution beforehand. It can be frustrating when you hear the same complaints repeatedly. You start to question whether there is something that can be done to prevent these situations from arising. Sound like your company? Corporate zombies may have overrun your company.

The best companies in the world attempt to predict potential issues in advance and work to find a solution to those issues before they become a problem. They think about how they could improve the current product or service. They don’t just move onto the next project because they finished the previous. This lack of initiative in companies is destroying any chances of gaining real value.

How to Combat Corporate Zombies

A general does not go into battle without a game plan, so why would you? To take down the army of corporate zombies that have been building up for years, you need a firm strategy to combat them. Some of the strategy needs to include changing the culture of your company and taking control over the hiring process. You cannot allow that army of zombies to continue to build.

Build a team that defies the norm. Click here to download our free 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team whitepaper and start combatting those corporate zombies.

corporate zombiesThink Critically

The best way to combat those cash-sucking employees is to encourage critical thinking. Try not to just settle for the easiest and quickest solution. Instead, create teams to provide the best solution for your company and for your customers. If you do not encourage and demand that your employees think beyond what they have been taught to do, the cycle of producing the same type of person will continue. Hire each person for a very specific purpose. As one of your largest expense items, it is your role as a financial leader to cultivate the best employees.

Challenge your management to do better instead of letting them do their jobs like they have been for years. Corporate zombies do not like to be attacked. Defy the norm and think critically about how you can go against the grain.

corporate zombiesTransform Your Culture – Reengagement

If you are a company full of the same type of employees, step up and reengage the management with the reality of what is going on. The culture of the company needs to shift before it inevitably falls. Create a culture of accountability by implementing teams, improving leadership philosophies, and building on the strengths of individual employees. Harvard Business School Professor of Leadership, Leslie Perlow, describes transformation of company culture this way: “If you try to do things differently, you will find it incredibly valuable. It’s rallying together to recognize that if we continue to work in this way, it’s undermining our productivity, our sustainability, our creativity.” (Entrepreneur)

Address quality in your company. Create quality controls in your company to push your employees to do better than they did yesterday. Your company, customers, and shareholders will be thankful that you did that (and your competitors will be cursing you).

Take Control of Recruiting

As the financial leader of your company (CFO, CEO, controller, entrepreneur, etc.), take control of your recruiting. If you are looking to be successful and grow substantially, you must have the right employees. They must challenge you like you challenge them. Although it may feel nice to have a yes-man, a yes-man is only looking to get your job or to get on your level. A star-quality team requires different people to contribute to the overall success. Start assessing your current team and transform your hiring process by learning what it takes to have a star-quality team. Download our free 5 Guiding Principles for Recruiting a Star-Quality Team to stop the rise up of corporate zombies in your company.

corporate zombies

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Recruiting Manual in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan shows you how you can recruit and hire the right team.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

corporate zombies

0

How to Manage Organizational Diversity

diversityIn the United States, we live in a melting pot of diversity. Since diversity is present in American society, you would probably expect it to be prevalent in most workplaces. Unfortunately, as a society we often look at diversity as a disadvantage instead of an opportunity to help us succeed. Interpersonal conflict caused by diversity leads organizations in the wrong direction. We should instead utilize diversity to unite and strengthen our organizations, not to create divisions.  Diverse demographics, experiences, and knowledge in organizations will foster creativity, innovation, and improvement.

How to Manage Organizational Diversity

Following are strategies on how to manage organizational diversity in your business:

1.  Effective Communication

Communication in the workplace is crucial to unite and strengthen the organization on the same values, policies, and goals. Thus, employers should clearly communicate expectations to employees. In the beginning, employers and managers must outline expectations for employees about workplace conduct, including how employees should handle workplace diversity. Adapting to diversity keeps an organization flexible and strong.

2.  Cultural Sensitivity

Organizations play a role in employees’ sensitivity to different cultures. From the start, employees should be taught to handle organizational diversity in a professional and respectful manner. Structuring projects to be balanced with diverse ethnicities, genders, ages, and races will expose employees to diversity and eliminate prejudices and discrimination. As a result, this enables employees to identify and emphasize with others.

3.  Commitment to Diversity

The top management of an organization must serve as an example to other employees by demonstrating a commitment to diversity. If inequality or interpersonal conflicts exist due to diversity, management must intervene. Accountability is critical if managers want employees to take be respectful of diverse individuals. If managers and employees are accountable for their conduct, then they will take pride in how they treat other employees.

It takes hard work and commitment to manage a diverse workplace. Top managers and employees should therefore strive to create an organizational culture taking pride in the individuality of people. By utilizing employees’ unique talents and abilities, you can then unite and strengthen your organizations and develop a competitive advantage in the market. What types of diversity do you have in your workplace?

If you want to learn more financial leadership skills, then download the free 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

How to Manage Organizational Diversity

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Flash Report Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan to manage your company before your financial statements are prepared.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

How to Manage Organizational Diversity

0

Organizational Structure

See Also:
Organizational Structure: Advantages of Centralization
Organizational Structure: Advantages of Decentralization
Capital Structure Management

Organizational Structure Definition

Organizational structure is the way responsibility, authority, and lines of communication are arranged. It is also how all processes occur in a company. Additionally, this term is commonly referred to as organizational culture.

The most common organizational structure include hierarchy with employees comprising vertical layers of rank where each layer is superior to the layers below and subordinate to the layers above. In addition, most large organizations divide their employees up into subunits called divisions, departments, segments, business units, work units, or groups. The objective is to get employees at all levels and across all subunits working towards the goals of the organization.

Organizational Structure: Models

Models exist on many levels. To simplify the matter, however, they generally fall into two categories: centralized or decentralized. This main theory is studied across the world.

Centralization vs. Decentralization

Organizational structure in business is either centralized or decentralized. Thus, centralization and decentralization are two ends of a spectrum. You can find organizations somewhere along that spectrum. Companies with centralized structure concentrate their authority in upper levels of management. For example, the military has a centralized organization structure. This is because the higher ups order those below them and everybody must follow those orders.

Unlike centralized companies, decentralized companies have less concentrated authority. In a decentralized organization, lower levels in the organizational hierarchy can make decisions. An example of a decentralized organization is a fast-food franchise chain. Each franchised restaurant in the chain is responsible for its own operation. Broadly speaking, companies start out as centralized organizations and then progress towards decentralization as they mature. This structure, horizontal when decentralized, places power in the decision maker on the ground floor.

To learn more financial leadership skills, download the free 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

Organizational Structure

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Flash Report Execution Plan in SCFO Lab.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

Organizational Structure

0