Tag Archives | budgeting

Margin vs Markup

See Also:
Gross Profit Margin Analysis
Retail Markup
Chart of Accounts (COA)
Margin Percentage Calculation
Markup Percentage Calculation

Markup vs Margin Differences

Is there a difference between margin vs markup? Absolutely. More and more in today’s environment, these two terms are being used interchangeably to mean gross margin, but that misunderstanding may be the menace of the bottom line. Markup and profit are not the same! Also, the accounting for margin vs markup are different! A clear understanding and application of the two within a pricing model can have a drastic impact on the bottom line. Terminology speaking, markup percentage is the percentage difference between the actual cost and the selling price, while gross margin percentage is the percentage difference between the selling price and the profit.

So, who rules when seeking effective ways to optimize profitability?. Many mistakenly believe that if a product or service is marked up, say 25%, the result will be a 25% gross margin on the income statement. However, a 25% markup rate produces a gross margin percentage of only 20%.

(NOTE: Want the Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide? It walks you through a step-by-step process to maximizing your profits on each sale. Get it here!)

Markup vs Gross Margin; Which is Preferable?

Though markup is often used by operations or sales departments to set prices it often overstates the profitability of the transaction. Mathematically markup is always a larger number when compared to the gross margin. Consequently, non-financial individuals think they are obtaining a larger profit than is often the case. By calculating sales prices in gross margin terms they can compare the profitability of that transaction to the economics of the financial statements.

Steps to minimize Markup vs Margin mistakes

Terminology and calculations aside, it is very important to remember that there are more factors that affect the selling price than merely cost. What the market will bear, or what the customer is willing to pay, will ultimately impact the selling price. The key is to find the price that optimizes profits while maintaining a competitive advantage. Below are steps you can take to avoid confusion when working with markup rates vs margin rates:

  • Use a pricing model or pricing tool to quote sales. Have the tool calculate both the markup percentage and the gross margin percentage
  • Relate gross margin percentage per sales invoice to income statement
  • Organize your chart of accounts to compare gross margin rate to sales quotes
  • Educate your sales force on the differences. By targeting the gross margin percentage vs the markup percentage you can throw an additional 2 – 3 percent profit to the bottom line!

Still deciding whether to use margin or markup to establish a price? Easily discover if your company has a pricing problem and fix it with either margin or markup. Download the free Pricing for Profit Inspection Guide to learn how to price profitably.

margin vs markup

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margin vs markup

Margin vs Markup Chart

15% Markup = 13.0% Gross Profit
20% Markup = 16.7% Gross Profit
25% Markup = 20.0% Gross Profit
30% Markup = 23.0% Gross Profit
33.3% Markup = 25.0% Gross Profit
40% Markup = 28.6% Gross Profit
43% Markup = 30.0% Gross Profit
50% Markup = 33.0% Gross Profit
75% Markup = 42.9% Gross Profit
100% Markup = 50.0% Gross Profit

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Budgets and Forecasting

The holiday season is upon us and the New Year will be here before we know it. For most business owners, this is also the season of financial planning and budgeting for 2013. Some have even gone through the budgeting and forecasting process to be better prepared for the upcoming year. But have you ever wondered about the necessity of doing both a budget and a forecast? Do you even know the difference between forecasts and budgets? Often, the terms are used interchangeably.

While this topic has often been the subject of debate, the budget and forecast differences are actually very clear. The success of any business is dependent upon the handling and management of the finances. This is exactly why knowing the relationship between these two important tools is not only useful in planning for the future, but is also excellent for keeping the business moving forward throughout the year. Here’s an excerpt from wikicfo.com highlighting how budgets and forecasts are different, but how both can be very useful tools for business owners and key decision makers when it comes to the financial planning of the company…

Budgeting can be a good tool to use to help plan the future of the business; however a greater predictor of future behavior is past behavior. The purpose of investing time to create a financial forecast is to predict the future based upon certain assumptions while using the past to defend those assumptions.

Read the full article here.

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Capital Budgeting Methods

“Most small to medium sized companies have no idea how to approach capital investments. They treat it as if it were an operating budget decision rather than a long-term, strategic decision that will impact their cash flow, efficiency of their daily operations, income statement, and taxable income for years to come. They need your help understanding the importance of and then making the right capital budgeting decisions.

Capital budgeting decisions relate to decisions on whether or not a client should invest in a long-term project, capital facilities and/or capital equipment/machinery. Capital budget decisions have a major effect on a firm’s operations for years to come, and the smaller a firm is, the greater the potential impact, since the investment being made could represent a substantial percent of the firm’s assets….”

More at WikiCFO.com

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