Tag Archives | behavior

Behavior of Successful People

behavior of successful people

When researching the behavior of successful people, I came along an article regarding unsuccessful people. Steve Tobak wrote an article in Entrepreneur called 10 Behaviors You Never See in Successful People.  In his experience working with business owners over several decades, Tobak observed that behavior, as opposed to intrinsic characteristics or habits, determined whether an individual was successful or not.

Behavior of Successful People

In particular, he identified 10 behaviors that he never observed in successful people.  If you are looking to become a successful person, then you need to identify if you have behaviors of unsuccessful people. They include the following:

  1. Naivety
  2. Panic
  3. Fanaticism
  4. Laziness
  5. Quick-fix mentality
  6. Acting out
  7. Selfishness
  8. Living in the past or future
  9. Lighthearted indifference
  10. Oversensitivity

In the article, Tobak discusses (sometimes irreverently) why, over time, these particular behaviors will inevitably lead to failure.  Furthermore, probably my favorite quote of the piece is regarding laziness. Additionally, Tobak writes, “Most people are slackers. That’s why most people don’t achieve great things.  Simple as that.”

Click here to read the full article. Then come back and let me know what you thought of it. If you want to determine which candidates are the right fit for your company, then download your free white paper, 5 Guiding Principles For Recruiting a Star-Quality Team.

Behavior of Successful People

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Behavior of Successful People

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How to Run an Effective Meeting

How to Run an Effective Meeting

When you run an effective meeting, it saves both time and money. In addition, you are also able to accomplish more. There are 5 steps on how to run an effective meeting, including the following:

Consensus/Feedback

Take a few minutes at the start of a meeting to clarify everyone’s understanding of the basic elements: purpose, agenda, ground rules, process, etc. Leave a few minutes at the end of a meeting for feedback, e.g. what worked, what didn’t work; did we achieve the meeting goals, why / why not.

Agenda/Purpose

Nothing ruins a meeting faster than getting off-track. Staying “on point” per an agenda should be your primary objective when you are running a meeting. All agendas should be in writing. Distribute them in advance whenever possible and make sure everyone understands why they’re there at the start of the meeting.

Ground Rules

Set rules for your meetings. Are cell phones allowed to be on? Is anyone allowed to speak up anytime he/she has something to say? When are challenges or criticisms allowed? Ground rules governing group behavior should be posted somewhere in the meeting space where everyone can see them. Get “buy-in” during your opening remarks.

Leadership/Facilitation

Just because you called the meeting or just because you’re “the boss” doesn’t mean you have to lead or facilitate the meeting. Ideally, someone who is not a stakeholder in the meeting should facilitate. Two benefits come from this. First, the facilitator can concentrate on making sure the meeting is productive without worrying about the content of the outcome. Second, you are free to engage fully in the meeting content without worrying about the process of the meeting. Also, ask another person to be a scribe when lists are being written on a flip chart or dry-erase board.

Process

From brainstorming for a new idea to getting through a highly structured weekly staff meeting, there is a process that can help move the group smoothly from start to finish. Get clarity that everyone understands the process, and then get everyone involved.

To learn more financial leadership skills, download the free 7 Habits of Highly Effective CFOs.

how to run an effective meeting

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how to run an effective meeting

See Also:
How to compensate sales person
How to Hire New Employees
Employee Health Insurance Plan
How to develop a controller
How To Train People For Success

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Taxes Drive Behavior!

scottish maid

Taxes Drive Behavior Example

Taxes drive behavior in business! In 1839, a new design of sailing ship, the Scottish Maid, was launched in Aberdeen, Scotland. The Scottish Maid was the first British clipper ship designed to take advantage of the tonnage regulations imposed by Britain in 1836. The new regulations measured the depth and breadth and the length at half the mid-ship depth. Any length above the halfway mark was tax free.

As a result of the new design, the ship has a more squared off bow than other designs. This new design was so successful that many frequently copied and used the design for more than 50 years. A floating example of the clipper ship is the Elissa. It is harbored in Galveston Texas.

This is just one example of tax regulations driving behavior. As our government enacts the new tax codes, expect companies and investors to react in a way to minimize their tax liability. With the new health care laws taking affect in 2014, businesses will rethink their employee benefits. In some cases, they are going to change who is an actual employee.

If you want to overcome obstacles and prepare how your company is going to react to external factors, then download your free External Analysis whitepaper.

taxes drive behavior

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taxes drive behavior

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