Tag Archives | balance sheet

Unearned Revenue

See Also:
Accounts Payable

Unearned Revenue Definition

Unearned revenues are titles for certain revenues that have not been earned. You can also call unearned revenues deferred revenues. Though it seems comically intuitive, unearned revenue is very important and often observed in the real world. In accounting, they are represented as liabilities on the balance sheet. This is because it represents an unfulfilled promise for a service by a company to a buyer. Furthermore, it is represented by a credit on the balance sheet, offset by Cash received by the service provider. In order to balance this liability, service revenue is the debit to the balance sheet that matches up with the unearned revenue credit.

Unearned Revenue Explained

Take, for example, a business situation that would exist between a carpet cleaning company and a homeowner. Before any service takes place, the cleaning company shows up at the house and gives the homeowner an estimate. The homeowner seems pleased with the estimate and pays the cleaner on the spot. At this point, the cleaning company has acquired an unearned revenue liability. In all likelihood, the liability will be cleared overtime with service. Until then, the cleaning company has money that they have not yet earned: “unearned revenue.”

unearned revenue, Deferred Revenues, unearned revenues

 

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Treasury Stock

Treasury Stock Definition

The treasury stock definition is the shares a company buys of its own stock on the open market. Shares of treasury stock were issued by the company, and then repurchased. So consider it issued, but not outstanding. After a company repurchases shares of its own stock, there are fewer shares of its stock trading on the open market.

Treasury stock can either be retired (cancelled) or resold on the open market. In addition, the shares have no voting rights, and they do not pay or accrue dividends. It is not included in financial ratios that use the value of common stock.

Treasury Stock on the Balance Sheet

Record treasury stock in the owner’s equity section of the balance sheet. Then record it at cost – what the company paid to acquire the shares – and subtract the value of the treasury stock from the stockholders’ equity account. The treasury stock account is a contra-equity account.

Stock Buyback (Repurchase Shares; Buyback Shares)

There are several reasons why a company would repurchase its own shares, including the following.

1. A company might buyback shares if it considers its stock undervalued. If the stock is undervalued, then management might want to buy shares because they consider them cheap.

2. Fewer outstanding shares increase the value per share, so a company might buyback shares to benefit its shareholders. For tax reasons, a share buyback can be superior to paying dividends to shareholders. (Depending on the difference between the tax rate that applies to dividends and the tax rate that applies to capital gains.)

3. A company can also repurchase shares to exercise stock options or to convert convertible bonds.

4. You can use stock buyback to thwart a takeover – if a company buys its own stock, then that stock is no longer available to the potential acquirer.

5. A company can alter its debt-to-equity ratio by issuing bonds and using the proceeds to repurchase stock.

6. A stock buyback could also be a sign that the company has excess cash and no other viable investment opportunities.

Treasury Stock Definition

See Also:
Convertible Debt Instrument
Common Stock Definition
Reverse Stock Split
Preferred Stocks
Hedging Risk
Private Placement

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Trade Credit

See Also:
5 Cs of Credit
Credit Sales
Standard Chart of Accounts
Income Statement
Free Cash Flow

Trade Credit Definition

The trade credit definition refers to postponing payment for goods or services received. Another trade credit definition is buying goods on credit, or extending credit to customers. It is also receiving goods now and paying for them later. And trade credit is delivering goods to a customer now and agreeing to receive payment for those goods at a later date. Trade credit terms often require payment within one month of the invoice date, but may also be for longer periods. Most of the commercial transactions between businesses involve trade credit. This type of credit facilitates business to business transactions and is a vital component of any commercial industry.

If a consumer receives goods now and agrees to pay for them later, then the consumer purchased the goods with trade credit. Likewise, if a supplier delivers goods now and agrees to receive payment later, then the sale was made with trade credit. There are two types of trade credit: trade receivables and trade payables. Trade credit payables and receivables can become complex. It is important to manage trade credit properly and accurately.


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Accounting Trade Credit

For accounting trade credit, the value of goods bought on credit is recorded on the balance sheet in an account called accounts payable, representing money the company owes for goods it already received. These are trade payables.

While the value of goods sold on credit is recorded on the balance sheet in an account called accounts receivable, representing the money owed to a company for goods it already delivered to customers. These are trade receivables.

Trade credit is essentially a short-term indirect loan. When a supplier delivers goods to a buyer and agrees to accept payment later, the supplier is essentially financing the purchase for the buyer. Trade credit is an interest-free loan. As long as the buyer postpones payment, the buyer is saving the money that would have been spent on interest to finance the purchase with a loan. At the same time, the supplier is losing the interest it would have earned had it received the payment and invested the cash. Therefore, the buyer wants to postpone payment as long as possible and the supplier wants to collect payment as soon as possible. That is why suppliers often offer discount credit terms to buyers who pay sooner rather than later.

Trade Receivables Definition

Trade receivables represent the money owed but not yet paid to a company for goods or services already delivered or provided to the customer. The goods were delivered. Then the company recorded the sale. But the cash was not yet received. Record trade receivables as an asset on the balance sheet in an account called accounts receivable.

Trade Payables Definition

Trade payables represent the money a company owes but has not yet paid for goods or services that have already been delivered or provided from a supplier. The goods were received, the expense was recorded, but the cash was not yet paid. Trade payables are recorded as a liability on the balance sheet in an account called accounts payable.

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Retained Earnings

See Also:
Accounting Income vs Economic Income
Realized and Unrealized Gains and Losses
Operating Income
Overhead Definition

Retained Earnings

Retained earnings (RE) refers to the portion of a company’s net income that is reinvested in the company. It is also the amount of profit left over after the company pays dividends to its stockholders.

Record RE in the owners’ equity section of the balance sheet. The account is cumulative. So, add profits and subtract losses from the account each accounting period. The RE account links the income statement and the balance sheet. If the account is negative, then it is either accumulated deficit, accumulated losses, or retained losses.

Calculating Retained Earnings

To calculate retained earnings, start with the value of the RE account from the previous period. Then add net income for the period and subtract dividends paid. In conclusion, the result is the new value of this account.

New RE = Prior RE + Net IncomeDividends 

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retained earnings

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Paid in Capital (APIC)

See Also:
Common Stock Definition
Preferred Stocks (Preferred Share)
Treasury Stock (Repurchased Shares)
Owner’s Equity
Balance Sheet

Paid in Capital Definition

The paid in capital definition is the total amount paid on equity or stock over the par value of the stock. In addition, it is a balance sheet account in the stockholder’s equity section. This account simply represents the market value over the book value of the equity. It is also called the premium stock, premium on stock, or additional paid in capital (APIC).


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Paid in Capital Equation

The following paid in capital equation is simply put as the amount paid for the stock over the par value of the stock:

Amount Paid Common Stock – Par Value Common Stock = Additional Paid in Capital

Usually the amount paid for the stock is at the market value so the following formula can also be looked at:

Market Value Stock – Book (par) Value Stock = Additional Paid in Capital

Paid in Capital Example

For example, Yazoo inc. is looking to make a public offering in the market for $2 par value common stock in the amount of 100,000 shares. Thus, the book value of the common stock is $200,000. The investment bank believes that the company will be able to receive a price based on its current market value of stock at $20 per share. Yazoo is unsure that they can receive this price. So, they opt to sell the stock at $19 per share first to the investment bank allowing them to make the offering. They can now debit cash in the amount of $1.9 million. Yazoo will also credit common stock for $200,000 or the book value, and it will also credit the additional paid in capital (APIC) account for the remainder of $1.7 million.

Note: If successful in supplying the market with the stock, then the investment bank will make a profit of $1 million dollars that Yazoo would not see. However, many companies perform this same maneuver to take the volatility of the market out of the equation allowing Yazoo to lock in a price for the financing that they will receive. This is where the term underwriting comes from when referring to investment banking.

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Paid in Capital Definition, Paid in Capital Equation, Paid in Capital

 

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Operating Lease

An operating lease is a short-term off-balance-sheet lease agreement. This type of lease is not recorded on the lessee’s balance sheet. This type of lease typically spans a small portion of the asset’s useful life, and the lessor retains the risks and benefits of ownership. For example, in an operational lease, the lessor is responsible for service and maintenance of the asset throughout the duration of the lease. You can also call it a service lease.

Operating Lease Treatment

According to GAAP, property leased with this kind of lease is not recorded on the lessee’s balance sheet. Lease payments are recorded as rent expenses on the income statement.

Finance Lease versus Operating Lease

There are two main differences between capital (finance) leases and operating leases.

1. With a capital lease, the lessee must record both a lease asset and a lease liability on their balance sheet. With an operating lease, this is not required.

2. With a capital lease, the lessee assumes both the risks and benefits of owning the asset. With an operating lease, the lessor retains the risks and benefits of owning the asset throughout the duration of the lease.

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Operating Lease
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Operating Lease

See also:

Capital Lease Agreement
Commercial Lease

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Notes Receivable

See Also:
Notes Payable
Treasury Notes (t notes)
Accounts Receivable
How to collect accounts receivable
Balance Sheet

Notes Receivable Definition

The notes receivable is an account on the balance sheet usually under the current assets section if its life is less than a year. Specifically, a note receivable is a written promise to receive money at a future date. The money is usually made up of interest and principal.

Notes Receivable Explained

A note receivable is often formed when a business, usually a bank, makes a loan to another business. A note will often be for less than a year, but some can be well in excess of this time frame. Recognize notes receivable income as interest income on the income statement. Thus, when payment is made the amounts effect the balance sheet as well as the income statement.

Notes Receivable Example

Money Bank is extending a $100,000 90 day note to Toys Inc. so that they can fund some of its short term needs for financing during the year. The note has an interest rate of 5% and is recorded by the bank as a note receivable on Money’s balance sheet under the current assets section. At the end of the term, Toys inc. will pay the $100,000 in principal back to Money Bank, and approximately $1,233 (100,000 * 90/365 * .05) worth of interest. Record the amount as interest income on the incomes statement at the end of the year.

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Notes Receivable

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Notes Receivable

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