Tag Archives | adding value

5 Ways a CFO Adds Value

ways a CFO adds valueCheck out the following 5 ways a CFO adds value and how they can take their role to the next level – gaining more respect, increasing salary, etc.

Ways a CFO Adds Value

1.  The CFO Enables the Company to Grow Faster

CFO responsibilities include the following:

  • Formulating and implementing financial strategies
  • Managing the company’s financial departments
  • Ensuring that the company is in compliance with industry and legal standards

An effective CFO analyzes the company’s current financial position and market trends. Furthermore, this enhances financial strategies and improve cash flow and profits, while still keeping a lid on costs. This also enables the company to grow faster and more resourcefully.

2.  The CFO can Improve Company Profitability

Controlling costs, improving productivity, and analyzing and suggesting pricing strategies are three ways the CFO can impact the bottom line. Through oversight and management of the financial departments, the CFO has access to past and current financial reports. Access to this information gives the CFO ability to evaluate how the company can control costs in order to maximize profits. The CFO should also evaluate the productivity of employees in different departments. Then determine if there are any patterns of bottlenecks or slow-downs in operations. The financial reports will then enable the CFO to analyze net income from sales revenues and operational expenses. Then he or she can recommend optimal pricing strategies for the company’s products or services.

3.  The CFO can Improve Cash Flow

By managing the cash conversion cycle, the CFO can help the company improve collections, pricing, and terms resulting in increased liquidity. Cash flow projections prepared by the CFO provide a means for management of the lifeblood of the company – cash.

4.  The CFO has the Ability to Obtain Increased Leverage from Banks

Banks want to see in-house financial expertise. An effective CFO will enhance the financial know-how and of the company when working with banks. In smaller companies, the CEO usually handles bank relationships. In larger companies with different departments and extensive operations, a financial team led by a CFO is necessary to handle company finances and communicate with banks in financial language. An effective CFO knows that maintaining open lines of communication with their banker will enable the company to better access the funds needed for growth.

5.  The CFO Provides Leadership and Direction Throughout the Company

The CEO looks to the CFO to be a sounding board for new ideas, present and sell the financial picture to others and “peek around corners”. An effective CFO can also bring financial insight to sales and operations departments who often distance themselves from company finances or financial strategies. If both sales and operations work together with the CFO to maximize profits by increasing cash flow and minimizing costs, the entire company will become more successful.

If you want more tips on how to improve cash flow, then click here to access our 25 Ways to Improve Cash Flow whitepaper.

ways a CFO adds value, Value-Adding CFO, CFO adds value
Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Strategic Pricing Model Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan to set your prices to maximize profits.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

ways a CFO adds value, Value-Adding CFO, CFO adds value

1

EBITDA Valuation

See Also:
Valuation Methods
Success Is Your Business
Self-Liquidating Loans
What is dilution, how is it calculated, and how should you manage it?
Which Bank to Choose?
Calculate EBITDA
Adjusted EBITDA

EBITDA Valuation Method

There are multitudes of ways to value a company, as well as specific equity and debt claims on a company’s assets. One is the EBITDA valuation method, which relies on a multiple of EBITDA to arrive at a company’s enterprise value.

The definition of enterprise value is the total value of a firm’s equity and debt. It can also be thought of as the total market value of a company’s expected cash flow stream. A company’s EBITDA is a measure of that stream. Furthermore, EBITDA is a company’s net income with tax, interest, depreciation, and amortization expenses added back. It is not an exact measure of a company’s cash flow, but it is one which has gained wide acceptance in the banking and investment communities.

Use the following enterprise valuation formula:

Enterprise Value = Multiple * EBITDA

where EBITDA is typically projected for the next twelve months. Sometimes, the amount used is the actual EBITDA of the company over the last twelve months. Label it as “LTM EBITDA.”

EBITDA Valuation Multiple

Base the multiple on comparable actual sales transactions occurred recently in the company’s industry. Often, one will use the derived multiples of publicly traded companies in the industry in addition to or in lieu of actual transactions.

Also, while you may use a single value for the EBITDA multiple, you often get a range. This range is based on the distribution of comparable multiples, with abnormally high or low multiples excluded so as to provide a useful range for the end user of the valuation.

Valuing Equity Using the EBITDA Valuation Method

Use the EBITDA valuation method to value a company’s total equity. After arriving at the company’s enterprise value using the formula described above, subtract the net debt of a company to determine the value of the equity claim on the firm’s total cash flow. Methods used to directly value equity adjust the firm’s cash flow to yield the cash flow available to shareholders. This is also known as “Free Cash Flow to Equity.”

Use the following formula to value equity using the EBITDA valuation method:

Equity Value = Enterprise Value – Total Debt – Cash and Cash Equivalents

Problems with the EBITDA Valuation Method to Value Equity

The primary problem is that this method relies on EBITDA as a measure of a firm’s cash flow, ignoring other significant factors which can impact a company’s cash flow, such as changes in working capital and capital expenditures. If you’re looking to sell your company in the near future, download the free Top 10 Destroyers of Value whitepaper to learn how to maximize your value.

ebitda valuation

Strategic CFO Lab Member Extra

Access your Exit Strategy Checklist Execution Plan in SCFO Lab. The step-by-step plan to get the most value out of your company when you sell.

Click here to access your Execution Plan. Not a Lab Member?

Click here to learn more about SCFO Labs

ebitda valuation

5

LEARN THE ART OF THE CFO