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Standard Chart of Accounts

See Also:
Chart of Accounts (COA)
Problems in Chart of Accounts Design
Complex Number for SGA Expenses
Role of a Company Back Office

Standard Chart of Accounts

In accounting, a standard chart of accounts is a numbered list of the accounts that comprise a company’s general ledger. Furthermore, the company chart of accounts is basically a filing system for categorizing all of a company’s accounts as well as classifying all transactions according to the accounts they affect. The standard chart of accounts list of categories may include the following:

The standard chart of accounts is also called the uniform chart of accounts. Use a chart of accounts template to prepare the basic chart of accounts for any subsidiary companies or related entities. By doing so, you make consolidation easier.

Organize in Numerical System

Furthermore, a standard chart of accounts is organized according to a numerical system. Thus, each major category will begin with a certain number, and then the sub-categories within that major category will all begin with the same number. If assets are classified by numbers starting with the digit 1, then cash accounts might be labeled 101, accounts receivable might be labeled 102, inventory might be labeled 103, and so on. Whereas, if liabilities accounts are classified by numbers starting with the digit 2, then accounts payable might be labeled 201, short-term debt might be labeled 202, and so on.


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Number of Accounts Needed

Depending on the size of the company, the chart of accounts may include either few dozen accounts or a few thousand accounts. Whereas, if a company is more sophisticated, then the chart of accounts can be either paper-based or computer-based. In conclusion, the standard chart of account is useful for analyzing past transactions and using historical data to forecast future trends.

You can use the following example of chart of accounts to set up the general ledger of most companies. In addition, you may customize your COA to your industry by adding to the Inventory, Revenue and Cost of Goods Sold sections to the sample chart of accounts.

SAMPLE CHART OF ACCOUNTS

Refer to the following sample chart of accounts. Each company’s chart of accounts may look slightly different. But if you are starting from scratch, then the following is great place to start.

1000 ASSETS

1010 CASH Operating Account
1020 CASH Debitors
1030 CASH Petty Cash

1200 RECEIVABLES

1210 A/REC Trade
1220 A/REC Trade Notes Receivable
1230 A/REC Installment Receivables
1240 A/REC Retainage Withheld
1290 A/REC Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts

1300 INVENTORIES

1310 INV – Reserved
1320 INV – Work-in-Progress
1330 INV – Finished Goods
1340 INV – Reserved
1350 INV – Unbilled Cost & Fees
1390 INV – Reserve for Obsolescence

1400 PREPAID EXPENSES & OTHER CURRENT ASSETS

1410 PREPAID – Insurance
1420 PREPAID – Real Estate Taxes
1430 PREPAID – Repairs & Maintenance
1440 PREPAID – Rent
1450 PREPAID – Deposits

1500 PROPERTY PLANT & EQUIPMENT

1510 PPE – Buildings
1520 PPE – Machinery & Equipment
1530 PPE – Vehicles
1540 PPE – Computer Equipment
1550 PPE – Furniture & Fixtures
1560 PPE – Leasehold Improvements

1600 ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION & AMORTIZATION

1610 ACCUM DEPR Buildings
1620 ACCUM DEPR Machinery & Equipment
1630 ACCUM DEPR Vehicles
1640 ACCUM DEPR Computer Equipment
1650 ACCUM DEPR Furniture & Fixtures
1660 ACCUM DEPR Leasehold Improvements

1700 NON – CURRENT RECEIVABLES

1710 NCA – Notes Receivable
1720 NCA – Installment Receivables
1730 NCA – Retainage Withheld

1800 INTERCOMPANY RECEIVABLES

 

1900 OTHER NON-CURRENT ASSETS

1910 Organization Costs
1920 Patents & Licenses
1930 Intangible Assets – Capitalized Software Costs

2000 LIABILITIES

 

2100 PAYABLES

2110 A/P Trade
2120 A/P Accrued Accounts Payable
2130 A/P Retainage Withheld
2150 Current Maturities of Long-Term Debt
2160 Bank Notes Payable
2170 Construction Loans Payable

2200 ACCRUED COMPENSATION & RELATED ITEMS

2210 Accrued – Payroll
2220 Accrued – Commissions
2230 Accrued – FICA
2240 Accrued – Unemployment Taxes
2250 Accrued – Workmen’s Comp
2260 Accrued – Medical Benefits
2270 Accrued – 401 K Company Match
2275 W/H – FICA
2280 W/H – Medical Benefits
2285 W/H – 401 K Employee Contribution

2300 OTHER ACCRUED EXPENSES

2310 Accrued – Rent
2320 Accrued – Interest
2330 Accrued – Property Taxes
2340 Accrued – Warranty Expense

2500 ACCRUED TAXES

2510 Accrued – Federal Income Taxes
2520 Accrued – State Income Taxes
2530 Accrued – Franchise Taxes
2540 Deferred – FIT Current
2550 Deferred – State Income Taxes

2600 DEFERRED TAXES

2610 D/T – FIT – NON CURRENT
2620 D/T – SIT – NON CURRENT

2700 LONG-TERM DEBT

2710 LTD – Notes Payable
2720 LTD – Mortgages Payable
2730 LTD – Installment Notes Payable

2800 INTERCOMPANY PAYABLES

2900 OTHER NON CURRENT LIABILITIES

3000 OWNERS EQUITIES

3100 Common Stock
3200 Preferred Stock
3300 Paid in Capital
3400 Partners Capital
3500 Member Contributions
3900 Retained Earnings

4000 REVENUE

4010 REVENUE – PRODUCT 1
4020 REVENUE – PRODUCT 2
4030 REVENUE – PRODUCT 3
4040 REVENUE – PRODUCT 4
4600 Interest Income
4700 Other Income
4800 Finance Charge Income
4900 Sales Returns and Allowances
4950 Sales Discounts

5000 COST OF GOODS SOLD

5010 COGS – PRODUCT 1
5020 COGS – PRODUCT 2
5030 COGS – PRODUCT 3
5040 COGS – PRODUCT 4
5700 Freight
5800 Inventory Adjustments
5900 Purchase Returns and Allowances
5950 Reserved

6000 – 7000 OPERATING EXPENSES

6010 Advertising Expense
6050 Amortization Expense
6100 Auto Expense
6150 Bad Debt Expense
6200 Bank Charges
6250 Cash Over and Short
6300 Commission Expense
6350 Depreciation Expense
6400 Employee Benefit Program
6550 Freight Expense
6600 Gifts Expense
6650 Insurance – General
6700 Interest Expense
6750 Professional Fees
6800 License Expense
6850 Maintenance Expense
6900 Meals and Entertainment
6950 Office Expense
7000 Payroll Taxes
7050 Printing
7150 Postage
7200 Rent
7250 Repairs Expense
7300 Salaries Expense
7350 Supplies Expense
7400 Taxes – FIT Expense
7500 Utilities Expense
7900 Gain/Loss on Sale of Assets

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standard chart of accounts

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standard chart of accounts

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 24, 2013. 

59

Outsource Definition

See Also:
Administration Expenses

Outsource Definition

The outsource definition is the practice of transferring business activities to an external organization instead of performing the activities internally.

Outsourcing Criteria

Companies may outsource business activities if they feel an external organization can perform the activities better or at a lower cast than if the company were to perform the activities itself. Outsourcing typically involves a contract between the company and the external organization that stipulates the costs, quality standards, and other conditions regarding the performance of the business activity.


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Insourcing

The decision to outsource instead of insource depends on the nature of the business. Typically, companies want to focus on their core business activities and outsource peripheral activities. Value chain analysis may help a company discover which activities to perform internally and which to consider outsourcing.

Activities that are commonly outsourced include bookkeeping, legal services, transportation, security, and other business activities. When deciding whether to outsource an activity or perform the activity internally, it is necessary to consider the advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing.

Outsourcing vs Insourcing

It may be advantageous to outsource an activity if doing so is cheaper than performing the activity internally. It may also be useful if the external organization has superior expertise in the activity. Outsourcing also allows a company to focus its attention on its core business activities.

There are also disadvantages to outsourcing. Outsourcing customer service operations may cause customers to feel disaffected when they find out they are not dealing with the company they are trying to reach. Also, if the external organization has access to sensitive information, then there may be a risk of information leaking to competitors or other parties. Outsourcing certain operational activities may cause the company to give up valuable customer data used for marketing purposes. And finally, outsourcing may require the company to incur the costs of monitoring and auditing the performance of the external organization.

Outsourcing Overseas

In today’s global economy, more and more companies are outsourcing business activities to external operations in other countries. Labor and operational costs may be significantly lower than in the company’s home country.

Guide to Outsourcing Your Business's Bookkeeping and Accounting


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Outsource Definition
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Outsource Definition

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 24, 2013. 

1

General Ledger Reconciliation and Analysis

See also:
Account Reconciliation
Standard Chart of Accounts
Problems in Chart of Account Design
Cash Flow Statement
Income Statement
Subsidiary Ledger

General Ledger Reconciliation and Analysis Definition

Define a general ledger as the financial record of every transaction of a company. Commonly, it is referred to as the “books” of the company. In the general ledger, record each of the transactions twice as both a subtraction (debit) and addition (credit). The general ledger is the main accounting record of the company.

Consequently, general ledger reconciliation is the process of ensuring that accounts contained in the general ledger are correct. In short, reconciliation makes sure you place the appropriate credit and debit in the associated accounts. Seemingly simple, this process requires an experienced bookkeeper when applied to small companies. Complicated applications require the hand of a trained CFO or equivalent controller. In either situation, a general ledger reconciliation policy must by enacted to ensure consistency.


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General Ledger Reconciliation Explanation

Not every general ledger account has a detail subsidiary ledger to reconcile to. Monthly all balance sheet accounts should be analyzed for accuracy. In addition, periodically it may be necessary to reconcile revenue accounts, expense accounts and miscellaneous balance sheet accounts.

In these cases the procedures are similar to reconciling an account to a subsidiary ledger. Print a detail general ledger transaction report for the account. Then, eliminate reversing journal entries correcting errors. Finally, investigate any transactions that are unusual in nature. For example a debit entry or decrease to a revenue account would be unusual.

Finally, prepare a detailed schedule of transactions remaining in the final balance.

General Ledger Reconciliation Process

Some wonder “what is general ledger reconciliation?”. Others wonder how to do general ledger reconciliation. For bookkeepers, adhere to the following process:

First, study the accounting policy of the company. Ignorance to this is missing the essential foundation of the process; knowing the rules is key.

Then, gather information. These include receipts, invoices, account statements, invoices, and related financial reports. This data is the information the accounting staff puts into accounts.

Third, ask questions about the accounts. What items did the company purchase? Do they relate to company policy? Why are they included in the given account? When were they spent/made?

Finally, document your work. Proper documentation ensures properly reconciled accounts as much as it ensures effective bookkeeping in the first place.

General Ledger Reconciliation Template

A general ledger reconciliations template can be found at: Microsoft Templates.

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Periodic inventory System

 

Overhead Expense Reduction

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 23, 2013. 

10

Overhead Expense Reduction

See Also:
Predetermined Overhead Rate
Activity Based Costing vs Traditional Costing
Activity Based Cost Allocation
Standard Cost

Overhead Expense Reduction

As a general precursor to Overhead expense reduction, Group Purchasing Organizations, Co-ops and Consortiums always lead to lower prices because they aggregate spends and create buying power. This may be true for smaller spends but as spends get larger ($100,000+ annually), you will often do better on your own when a supplier can customize a program to your specific purchasing patterns and needs.


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Category Specific Expertise

In reducing overhead expenses, expertise in purchasing for one cost category or in the request for proposal process will produce similar results in another cost category. What expertise in purchasing really means is an understanding of the unique data requirements and what drives supplier pricing to achieve the best results. You may use the same process in different categories. But without the category specific information, the results may not be the same at all.

Category specific information includes changes in the industry, contract nuances, and benchmark data.

Stay Loyal to The Supplier

Loyalty to a supplier always translates into the best value for your company (value = price + service) as well as the best opportunity to reduce overhead expenses. Quite often, long time loyalty leads to complacency from both the supplier and the purchaser. Industries and companies change over time and vendors providing operating supplies and services are no exception. Modest price increases year after year may seem acceptable when in reality the market may have changed, and the cost should actually be going down year after year. Compounding increases add up over the years.

How To Reduce Overhead Expenses

There are three things that you can do to reduce overhead expenses:

  1. Lower Costs with Incumbent Suppliers
  2. Ask Vendors to Help Manage Spend
  3. Create a Competitive Environment for Each Category

Lower Costs With Incumbent Suppliers

Ask your incumbent suppliers what you can do that will result in lower costs from them. Lower Cost can lead to a smaller Overhead-Rate which ultimately can lead to a reduction in overhead expenses. Work with your vendor as a team member – not as an adversary. If you can change a process or an ordering habit in your organization that reduces your vendor’s expense, then your vendor should reward you with lower prices which can lead to reduced overhead expenses.

Ask Vendor to Help Manage Spend

Then, ask your vendor to help you manage the spend. A proactive approach must be taken to reduce overhead expense. Are you leveraging the vendor’s platforms for ordering and managing information? Or can they track purchases by department and provide invoices already allocated to departments to ease the work of your Accounting Department? Can they inform you if employees do not follow established business rules (e.g., buy-off contract)? Do they have the technology to prevent your employees from buying off contract without proper approval?

Create Competitive Environment for Each Category

Finally, create a competitive environment for each category. Let your team and vendors know that there are no “sacred cows“. Have someone other than the supplier’s daily contact manage the expense review process. This enables greater objectivity and keeps personal relationships out of the process. Then give suppliers all of the information they need to sharpen their pencils and minimize their risk. The more they know about your usage and requirements, the better. Customers who inspire confidence and minimize the suppliers’ risk are rewarded with the most aggressive pricing. Reducing overhead expense requires an understanding of both your personnel, as well as the vendor’s.

When you know your overhead and how much you need to reduce it by, you can add real value to your organization.

The CEO's Guide to Improving Cash Flow


Overhead Expense Reduction

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 24, 2013. 

0

Payroll Accounting

See also:
Commission Accounting
PEO Arrangement Compared to Outsourcing Payroll
Direct Labor
Pension Plans
Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA)
Outsourced Accounting Services

Payroll Accounting

Payroll Accounting is the function of calculating and distributing wages, salaries, and withholdings to employees and certain agencies. It is generally done through different documents such as time sheets, paychecks, and a payroll ledger. Payroll Accounting also involves the process of issuing reports to upper management, so that they are able to make informed decisions about the company’s labor-cost data.

Payroll Accounts

Below are some payroll basic accounts that are used in association with accounting payroll entries as well as a description of each one and the relevance towards payroll.

Assets

Cash is the petty cash account which is used to empty the accrued payroll account when the payroll is distributed to the company’s employees.

Liabilities

Accrued Payroll represents a liability calculated by taking the gross pay and subtracting all deductions, or the amount that is due to the employees.

Federal Income Taxes Withheld

This account serves as a deduction from the gross pay or payroll account. It is an accumulation of payroll taxes as a percentage amount which is due to the U.S. Government. Payroll tax rates differ from business to business.

Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) Taxes Payable

The FICA Taxes Payable represents a liability that is due to the U.S. Government. It is then used to fund institutions like Medicare and the Social Security Administration.

Insurance Withheld

Insurance withheld is another deduction from the gross pay and represents a contribution to the employee’s insurance provided by the employer.

Note: Other voluntary payroll deductions and withholdings can be present like bond or stock withholdings that a company would use for investments on the employee’s behalf. Other deductions include union dues or pension funds that the company may hold for its employees.

Expenses

The payroll account is the gross pay that is calculated by a payroll accountant (i.e. the salary payment or the hourly rate times the number of hours worked).

Payroll Accounting Journal Entries

This is a typical accounting payroll example of journal entries when a company is calculating and distributing the payroll.

Account                           Dr.               Cr.

Calculation:
Payroll                           xxxx

Federal Income Taxes Withheld                       xxxx

FICA Taxes Payable                                  xxxx

Union Dues Withheld                                 xxxx

Bond Withholdings                                   xxxx

Accrued Payroll                                     xxxx
Distribution:
Accrued Payroll                   xxxx
Cash                                                xxxx

Payroll Accountant Duties

Oftentimes, companies outsource their payroll accounting to specialized firms. These firms can perform the same function for a much lower cost than if the company generated them in-house.


Click here to download: The Guide to Outsourcing Your Bookkeeping & Accounting for SMBs


There are six major job functions that the payroll department or specialized company must perform throughout the year, including the following:

1)  Compute gross pay (hourly or salary)

2)  Compute the total amount of deductions (FICA, taxes, etc.)

3)  Calculate the total amount due to employees i.e. the gross pay minus the amount of deductions.

4)  Authorize the amount of payments due to employees.

5)  Distribute the payroll once authorized.

6)  Issue reports to upper management concerning labor-cost data.

Accounting Payroll System

In the past, accounting payroll systems consisted of two journals. The first is the payroll journal. Then, the second is the payroll disbursements journal. Companies used the payroll journal to accrue for salaries and wages towards employees as well as government obligations withheld from the employee’s paycheck. Thus, companies used disbursements journal to pay off these accumulated accruals when they became due.

But thanks to computer systems like Peachtree and Quickbooks, they have combined both of these journals into a payroll ledger. Furthermore, you can outsource these payroll functions at a lower cost and efficiency for a company.

Guide to Outsourcing Your Business's Bookkeeping and Accounting


Payroll Accounting

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 24, 2013. 

0

PEO or Outsource Payroll

See Also:
Advantages of a PEO
What is a PEO?
How to Select a PEO
Professional Employer Organizations FAQ’s
Service Department Costs

PEO or Outsource Payroll

Do you have a PEO or outsource payroll? Under the PEO Arrangement, there is a co-employment relationship in which both the PEO and the Business Owner have an employment relationship with the employees. Contractually, the PEO and the Business Owner allocate and share many of the traditional employer responsibilities and liabilities. For example, the PEO assumes responsibilities and liability for employment related matters such as Payroll and Payroll Taxes, Employee Benefits, Human Resources Management, and Safety and Risk Management. As a result, the Business Owner can concentrate 100% on growing their Business.


Click here to download: The Guide to Outsourcing Your Bookkeeping & Accounting for SMBs


Outsourcing is a contractual arrangement, absent an employment relationship, with a vendor (and its supervised personnel), for services, either on the customer’s premises or off-site at the vendor’s location, to perform a function or run a department that was previously staffed and supervised by the customer directly. Furthermore, examples include: Payroll Processing, Financial Auditing, Agent of Record Services, and Legal Services.

Today’s Professional Employer Organization (PEO) is a “hybrid” of all of the honorable characteristics of the Staff Leasing Business Model. In addition, combine it with all of the efficiencies of the Outsourcing Business Model.

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PEO or Outsource Payroll

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PEO or Outsource Payroll

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on July 24, 2013. 

1

Single Member LLC Definition

Single Member LLC Definition

A Single Member LLC definition is a limited liability company with one member. It’s a type of entity that has caught on across the United States. It was created to satisfy emerging needs from the rapidly changing business world. One example of this is the owner/member requirements of limited liability companies. The owners are often not required to be individuals, citizens, or a specific type of business. This gives more flexibility to single member limited liability companies as well as conventional limited liability companies.

One LLC variable that varies from state to state is whether a husband and a wife can own a single member LLC. Some states allow this, while others prohibit it. As you can see, many questions and possibilities arise when forming this type of entity. If you are unsure, then seek professional advice to make sure that you are fully protected and acting within the law.

Why File For a Single Member LLC

LLCs have been very widespread since their invention. There are many different advantages of having an limited liability company. One of the broad advantages is the flexibility of taxes. Determine whether you want your LLC profit to flow-through to your personal income or whether it will be taxed as a corporation. The limited liability that this structure offers its members is another large advantage. LLCs’ liabilities are separate from the members as long as the corporate veil stays intact. One more significant benefit of limited liability companies is the ease of formation and lack of upkeep. LLCs have less stringent requirements than corporations and are faster, cheaper entities to form.


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Things to Consider First

If you’ve decided that an LLC or single member LLC is right for your business, then consider the following questions:

  • Will you be reinvesting a majority of profits into the business? If so, consider opting to be taxed as a corporation.
  • Are you going to do business internationally?
  • Is the single member LLC for you?
  • Are there multiple owners? Is your operating agreement thorough enough?
  • What are your state’s laws regarding LLCs?

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See also:
Corporate Veil

Originally posted by Jim Wilkinson on June 6, 2014. 

Single Member LLC definition

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